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The grotesque
Elza Adamowicz

(2005b: 105) underlines the corporeal, scatological implications of Schwitters’s Merz assemblages, resonating with Schmerz (pain) and merde (shit), Dorothea Dietrich (1993: 192) has isolated three types of grottoes incorporating various types of body fragments: Zivilisationgrottoes, filled with dismembered bodies, belonging to the category of the abject; Kulturgrottoes, where body fragments, evoking relics, were covered with the patina of memory; and finally, Freundschaftgrottoes, which housed objects and body-parts fetishistically linked to their owners. The actual

in Dada bodies
Kimberly Lamm

constitute it. In response, ‘Mama’s Baby’ is a call to develop forms of writing that can move between the repressed disorder of bodily erasure and the recognisable order of hyper-visibility. Spillers argues that the psychic legacies of ungendering need not automatically translate into disorder, nor do they have to be covered over or compensated for with the familiar icons through which black women have been named. Both can be revised. At her essay’s conclusion, Spillers argues not for redeeming or repressing the abjection attributed to the psychic legacies of ungendering

in Addressing the other woman
Fashion and protest
Ory Bartal

cheapest industrial material to oppose the traditional concept of luxurious perfume bottle. The installation, as I read it, touches on the concept of the abject, and presents another visual and theoretical development in Kawakubo’s work. The abject is a psychoanalytical term that indicates, according to Julia Kristeva, a mental state of chaos in the subject during the symbiosis stage with the mother – a state in which there is a terrifying presence of ‘the other’.54 In our adult life, this mental state is presented through the untouchable, degrading, dirty BARTAL

in Critical design in Japan
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Elza Adamowicz

that is most productive in reading the Ethnographic Museum photomontages, because they are grounded on the co-presence and collision of tribal imagery and modern female body-parts; they collapse binary structures (classical/­grotesque), undo hierarchies (the African in the service of the European) and celebrate materiality. This notion of the grotesque figure can be fruitfully linked to Julia Kristeva’s definition of the abject: ‘It is not the lack of cleanliness or health that causes abjection but what disturbs identity, order, system. What does not respect borders

in Dada bodies
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Spare parts
Elza Adamowicz

grotesque tradition depicts the body as monstrosity. Artistic practices of the grotesque were greatly extended from the late nineteenth century with the work on the unconscious in psychoanalysis, in ‘primitivism’ in art, collage in modernist aesthetics, the formless in Bataillean aesthetics, the abject in feminist criticism and virtual reality in contemporary culture. Dada pushed the grotesque genre to its limits. Dada bodies are material entities spilling out of their contours, based on a cavalier disregard for consummate style. Rejecting the establishment denial

in Dada bodies
Andrew Patrizio

‘objects without souls’, and therefore ethically available for pain, is not unconnected to our wider cultural interconnectedness with the other-than-human more generally. This is why zoos and other spaces in which the animal is visualised become meaningful and provocative for Berger (and indeed many in the animal studies literature). They perform, from their foundational origins to contemporary settings, a vague spectrum of activities that span the scientific and the (abject) spectacular. Berger’s contribution is in his identification that animals, for humans

in The ecological eye
Anna Dezeuze

, fugitive nature of an increasingly global modernity.29 In 2009, Hal Foster would also extend his account of the art of the two previous decades by observing that Joins in the age of ‘liquid modernity’ much art of the new century’s first decade could be described as ‘precarious’, in response to a climate of ‘social instability’ and a generalised ‘state of uncertainty’.30 In his 1996 study, Foster had singled out two main tendencies as instances of the 1990s ‘return of the real’: an ‘ethnographic turn’ and an appeal to theabject’. In his 2009 article for Artforum

in Almost nothing
Kimberly Lamm

, is similar in size and colour to the protest sign. The gravestone is a distorted mirror of the images with which Codex Artaud III begins. Spero exposes Artaud’s depiction of a woman collapsed into a corpse and made into a container of bodily waste, relegated to the work of containing the abject and impeded from the language of the external world. Visualising protest, Codex Artaud reflects upon the historical period from which it emerged, which was dense with insurgent acts that challenged the power of state aggression. Student walkouts, shutdown strikes, and anti

in Addressing the other woman
Kimberly Lamm

finding the means to represent the full range of their contradictions. And Johnson implies that feminist transgressions must be mirrored if they are not going to be discarded as extreme anomalies that confirm the monstrosity attributed to women but actually impact the symbolic order. Unlike Shelley, Solanas did not deflect her monstrosity with a metaphor; she made it the explicit subject of her work. She created deliberately vulgar words and images to describe the abjection of American women’s lives and expose the monstrosity that had been imposed upon them. Aligned

in Addressing the other woman
Jane Chin Davidson

concept in excreting bodily fluids. Viewing Configurations in the context of pumping breastmilk for her performance in Letdown, Chang’s work visualizes Luce Irigaray’s argument in her essay ‘The “Mechanics” of Fluids’ expressing the way in which the ‘specular image by a sexualized feminine body’ acknowledges ‘the failure to recognize a specific economy of fluids’ in the history of sexuality.44 The abjection of female bodily fluids has long been a feminist point of resistance to the masculinist censure of reproductive processes, which Chang also acknowledges by referring

in Staging art and Chineseness