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Distanciation and embodiment
Deborah Martin

-fight in town; Momi’s dip in the dirty pool and careful application of sun cream to her skin; the experiments of Luchi and Momi with sensory perception, especially vision; the experiments of Tali’s daughters with their voices as they sing into a whirring fan. The sticky, swampy world of the film emphasises dirt, bodily fluids, 34 The cinema of Lucrecia Martel odours and the abject. It privileges texture: rumpled sheets, peeling walls, the feeling of shampooing long hair. Images of hands, skin and touch abound. Through texture, smell and touch the film invites an

in The cinema of Lucrecia Martel
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Place, space and the gendered body in Isabel Coixet’s The Secret Life of Words (2005)
Helena López

) facilitate a privileged space to situate the experience of abjection. The abject subject constitutes an uncanny excess threatening the symbolic order (Kristeva, 1980 ). We have already seen how this abnormal excrescence in the social tissue, incarnated by Hanna’s communicative problems at the workplace, encourages her expulsion from the social body. But this repulsion does not necessarily imply an absolute differentiation between

in Hispanic and Lusophone women filmmakers
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Cinematic pleasures
Deborah Martin

’s expulsion or containment of the threat of the (sexually deviant or socially excluded) other. Instead, in Martel, the subversion of the dominant order always on some level flourishes, the repressed not just returning but continually suffusing and overturning that order, as I have argued is the case in La ciénaga’s embracing of the abject, in the way La niña santa allows threats to the dominant order to proliferate, and in La mujer sin cabeza’s final identification with the position of the ghost-child. Pervaded by the profound disjunctures and exclusions which characterise

in The cinema of Lucrecia Martel
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Shining a light on horror
Ann Davies

the maternal role: she states that ‘devotees of the abject … do not cease looking, within what flows from the other’s “innermost being”, for the desirable and terrifying, nourishing and murderous, fascinating and abject inside of the maternal body’ (Kristeva, 1982: 54). These flows include urine, blood, sperm and excrement. Barbara Creed has Davis_Calparsoro_01_Text.indd 167 14/11/08 19:58:31 168 The films in turn used these ideas to propose that horror texts tend to render the maternal in terms of the abject, linking the mother and bodily waste together in a

in Daniel Calparsoro
La Belle captive
John Phillips

author’s perspective, these motifs are associated with an attack on the revulsion inspired by bodily fluids and above all, by a desire to liberate the feminine, which should be celebrated, not vilified. Viscosity is a characteristic of blood, and so of the living body, but it is also a quality of what Julia Kristeva identifies as the abject. For Kristeva, all bodily waste and those substances and fluids that the body ejects

in Alain Robbe-Grillet
Victoria Best and Martin Crowley

resulted in works of a black and bitter negativity. But the inner contradictions of these works ask us to reassess the abject or traumatised body in society, to reconsider the link between sexuality and representation, and to readdress the anxieties and desires of postmodern culture. One text which responds in perplexing ways to Marzano’s critique is La Jeune Femme et la pornographie (1991) by the Quebecois poet Roger des

in The new pornographies
Phil Powrie

places inhabited by bodies that are at the mercy of (Mother) Nature, bodies that are potentially both seductive (including seducing oneself to sexual pleasure) and repulsive’ (Longhurst 2001 : 82). Reviewing the possible names one could give to such a space – Homi Bhabha’s ‘Third Space’, constituted by hybridity (Bhabha, 1994 ), or Kristeva’s chora , which is coterminous with the abject (see Kristeva 1982 : 13–14) – she

in The films of Luc Besson
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Martine Beugnet

. Throughout, the study will stress the link between Denis’ work and a tradition of counter-culture, both cinematic and literary. As such, the analysis of the films will highlight the director’s renewed fascination for the concepts of the sublime and the abject, and of difference and desire’s irreducible bond. It will also illustrate her attachment to the elaboration of a poetic vision detached from the hegemony of causality and

in Claire Denis
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John Phillips

, are devoid of any of the more messy aspects of sex, which is why he has expressed a distaste for Peter Greenaway’s obsession with dirt and decay: ‘The scenes that, let us say, involve sticky materials in my films are always very “clean”’ (Fragola and Smith 1992 : 135). In Julia Kristeva’s terms, the abject is almost completely absent, the one possible exception being a ‘pretend’ viscous fluid in L’Eden , in a scene that

in Alain Robbe-Grillet
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Victoria Best and Martin Crowley

), but to explore instead the significance that lies behind their appropriation and deformation. Not least, we recognise the need to explore the various discourses that result from often ambivalent acts of citation and deployment. These include, for example, the entanglement of the body in competing and contradictory realms of coding that confuse the sexual, the medical, the political, and the abject; equally at stake we find the status

in The new pornographies