Search results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • "the abject" x
  • Manchester International Relations x
Clear All
Jeremi Suri

cultures and damaged millions of acres of land. The most modern technology has often produced the least liveable consequences.22 The abject poverty of a country like Haiti is a 40 40 American foreign policy testament to the failure of repeated American nation-​building efforts, especially on an island so close to the United States.23 A high proportion of the victims of American nation-​building activities have included men and women of non-​white races. That is not a coincidence. Although race has not always driven American decision-​making, American citizens have

in American foreign policy
Abstract only
Elizabeth Dauphinée

instances of violence as genocides, holocausts, massacres – exceptions to the normative play of politics; the perpetrators, exceptional in the measure of their cruelty; the victims, exceptional in the abject, nameless destruction to which their identification as ‘victims’ assigns them. The victims of the Shoah, the victims of Tuol Sleng, the victims of Srebrenica and Guernica and Hiroshima become a nameless horde of wronged people – and their namelessness in our conceptual reckoning works to secure us from their deaths. The desire to secure and to securitize – to insulate

in The ethics of researching war
Elizabeth Dauphinée

not always clear in the complexities of the interstices, in the intersectionality that lies inevitably within the taxonomy – the ontology – of place and of naming. This is not to deny the abject position of the murdered as murdered, nor to deny the responsibility of the murderer by attenuating the reader to extenuating circumstances or to the fact that the murderer may also be a victim of another sort in another situation. The point is to suggest that the complexity of these relationships exposes the ethical water as fundamentally murky, and that there is a

in The ethics of researching war
Abstract only
Elizabeth Dauphinée

the total immersion in the local environment that would obscure or erase the boundary between Self and Other is precisely the reason for seeking out the next immersion experience. The quest to fully experience what is at stake for the Other is always foiled by the Self’s ability to leave the conflict or other extreme environment for the ‘safety’ of home. There is, alas, a difference between the roasting of lambs for journalists’ barbecues and the abject destruction of lives that is going on among Bosnians in the village below. Lloyd understands this at some level

in The ethics of researching war
Elizabeth Dauphinée

the world, to render it in a manner that allows it to be illuminated, to show forth in a logos, a pattern that is self-consistent and reasonable’, provides a reasoned and reasonable place for the abject destruction of infinite numbers of others.45 Perpetrators 2111 The inherent dignity of the victim is the authority under which the command is made to remember the victim as being stripped of dignity in the extreme.46 Similarly, the inherent humanity of the perpetrator betrays our desire to dehumanize him in the face of his dehumanizing actions. Our attempt to

in The ethics of researching war
Leonie Murray

associated with peace operations in places like Somalia and the former Yugoslavia and the abject failure to respond in any effective way in the face of the Rwandan genocide, followed by a reversal in the fortunes of the Middle East peace process, disillusioned international statespersons and sent many academics back to the drawing board, armed with the lessons of both the achievements and disappointments of this period.36 The al Qaeda attacks of 11 September 2001 and the period of US policy that followed also had a serious impact upon the ‘peace project’ as the globe

in Peacemaking in the twenty-first century
Alanna O’Malley

quash the secession. Press reports and statements issued to the world recorded the impressions of these European witnesses and painted an appalling picture of events. In one inflammatory report a journalist was quoted as saying that ‘[what] the UN forces [had done] was worse than anything the Nazis did’.189 As Young describes, with this depiction of the operation, in addition to the abject failure to satisfy most of its objectives with the mission, ‘the UN suffered a humiliating reverse’.190 It was not just the prolonged fighting and the mutiny of the civilian

in The diplomacy of decolonisation