Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 24 items for :

  • "twentieth century" x
  • Manchester Literature Studies x
Clear All
Abstract only

Journeys, Mobile Emotions (Farnham, 2009), p. 9; H. Wojtczak, ‘The railwaywoman’s journey’, in ibid., p. 54; and H. Wojtczak, Railwaywomen: Exploitation, Betrayal and Triumph in the Workplace (Hastings, 2005), pp. 5, 6, 19, 31, 107. 12 S. Smith, Moving Lives: Twentieth-Century Women’s Travel Writing (Minneapolis and London, 2001), p. 172. 13 D.H. Aldcroft, ‘A new chapter in transport history: the twentieth-century revolution’, JTH, 3:3 (February 1976), 218. j 15 J women, travel and identity 14 Nine of these students published their accounts under their

in Women, travel and identity
Imagining the female journeyer

respectability From the turn of the twentieth century images of women journeyers began to appear far more frequently in transport company advertising. This corresponds with the shift within the advertising industry away from advertisements that focused upon factual content, such as price, utility and quality, after 1880 towards associational images. Images became more important than providing information. Soap advertisements commonly featured beautiful women in various stages of undress from the late Victorian era onwards.22 Advertisements for an object or service reflect how

in Women, travel and identity

9 Beyond the witch trials Counter-witchcraft and popular magic The archaeology of counter-witchcraft and popular magic Brian Hoggard One aspect of the study of witchcraft and magic, which has not yet been absorbed into the main stream of literature on the subject, is the archaeological record of the subject. Objects such as witch-bottles, dried cats, horse skulls, shoes, written charms and numerous other items have been discovered concealed inside houses in significant quantities from the early modern period until well into the twentieth century. The locations

in Beyond the witch trials
Journeys by rail and sea, 1870–1940

Between 1870 and 1940, millions of Britons embarked on journeys abroad by train and ship, leaving their homes to participate in one of the great ages of journeying. Millions of women unhesitatingly seized their opportunity to journey abroad; yet these journeys have remained largely invisible. This book aims to redress this imbalance through a close examination of forty women's journeys abroad. Thirty of these were undertaken for leisure and pleasure to and around Europe, the Middle East and Asia. One was undertaken to improve the woman's health, but was also a journey of leisure. Two were emigration voyages by women who sought new lives in New Zealand. One was a family-and-duty journey on a troopship by a woman accompanying her husband to an army posting in India. Five women journeyed as a requirement of their work as nurses, teachers and domestic servants. Finally, one journey was undertaken both out of religious conviction and to support a family member: one woman accompanied her husband to a missionary station in Zululand, South Africa. The sexual threat women journeyers faced was also not as severe as some contemporaries believed. Vision and observation were further keynotes in the journey abroad. The argument that women's travel involved a rejection of the domestic has thus greatly distorted the nature of much female mobility in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Some Victorian images disappeared, replaced by a strength and confidence that reflected women's changed status and their new sense of what they could achieve.

Abstract only

This book is based on a paradox and a coincidence. The paradox is that at the end of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a period of profound secularisation in France, there emerged a generation of Catholic writers and intellectuals who were convinced that the rumours about God’s death had been greatly exaggerated. The coincidence is that, in the same period, English literature too saw a significant revival in Catholic writing. In France, the late novels of Joris Karl Huysmans, the plays of Paul Claudel and the religious

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914

In this chapter we will attempt to synthesise some of the most common accounts of the history of secularisation in France and England during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Our aim is to arrive at some understanding of the nature of individual and societal secularisation in England and France, and assess, in spite of the vast differences, what correlations can be drawn between the two countries. This will help us understand more clearly the preoccupations of the French and English Catholic authors and the conditions of belief under which they

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914

early twentieth centuries. In the first set of problems we must include the dilemmas of belief and unbelief by which ultimate purposes for action are embraced or rejected. Another issue following logically from this first is that if faith posits God as the ultimate purpose or destiny of human action, in what ways could Catholic literature imaginatively depict the problem of moral autonomy from God? Two additional issues exemplify the dilemmas just raised. First, the theme of homosexuality found in some Catholic writings highlights the

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Making the journey abroad

themselves modern women. Multiple estimates have been made of how many Britons emigrated in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, with totals ranging from a few to tens of millions.1 Recent calculations have suggested that between twelve and almost nineteen million Britons emigrated between 1815 and 1930.2 Few of these studies offer any significant commentary upon female migration, however.3 The estimates that have been made of female migration vary. One study of nineteenth-century emigration suggests that women made up 39 per cent of all emigrants from England and

in Women, travel and identity
Abstract only
Advice, etiquette and expectation

twentieth century, it is claimed, Britons ‘moved up a class’ on holiday, exchanging their everyday habits for the clothes, food, spending patterns, resorts and recreations of the j 79 J women, travel and identity class above them.45 Journey etiquette attempted to help women to ‘move up’ the social order by showing them how to appropriate the behaviour of those journeyers of a higher social status. Women’s role as social arbiters was extremely important in British society during this period: mistresses of large households, for example, were responsible for organizing

in Women, travel and identity
Abstract only

sexual morality and found the privacy in such heavily scrutinized environments to indulge in clandestine amour. The journey abroad was restrained and proper in its heterosexuality, and women usually observed contemporary mores about female sexuality and chastity, as is to be expected given that the period investigated here is not one characterized as sexually revolutionary, particularly compared to the later twentieth century. In being chaste they again conformed to the behaviour that was expected of the ‘perfect’, respectable female journeyer. Class, both socio

in Women, travel and identity