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The relationship between Scotland and the British Empire in the twentieth century was wide-ranging. This book represents ground-breaking research in the field of Scotland's complex and often-changing relationship with the British Empire in the period. The contours of Scottish intercontinental migration were significantly redrawn during the twentieth century as a consequence of two world wars. The book reveals the apparent means used to assess the complexities of linking places of birth to migration and to various modern attempts to appeal to ethnic diasporas. The strange case of jute brings out some paradoxical dimensions to Scotland's relationship with England and the empire in the twentieth century. The book argues that the Scottish immigrants' perceptions of class, race and gender were equally important for interpreting the range of their experiences in the British Columbia. The mainstay of organised anti-colonialist critique and mobilisation, in Scotland lay in socialist and social democratic groups. The book examines how the Scottish infantry regiments, and their popular and political constituencies, responded to rapidly reducing circumstances in the era of decolonisation. Newspapers such as The Scotsman, The Glasgow Herald, and the Daily Record brought Africa to the Scottish public with their coverage of Mau Mau insurgency and the Suez Crisis. The book looks into the Scottish cultural and political revival by examining the contributions of David Livingstone. It also discusses the period of the Hamilton by-election of 1967 and the three referenda of 1979, 1997 and 2014 on devolution and independence.

Class, race and gender

Early in the twentieth century the future lieutenant-governor of British Columbia, Robert Randolph Bruce, wrote to the English sporting magazine the Field , claiming that in his community a prospective settler would find ‘companions who have been at Eton; he will find golfers who have played at St Andrew’s; and in his hunts he will be joined by

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century

the institutions and cultural markers of that identity are perpetuated. From these conceptual reflections, this chapter examines examples of the Scots’ diasporic transnational identity as it was channelled through the British Empire in the twentieth century, first by where those migrants chose to establish their new lives, and then by the experience of imperial lives, and of

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century

see the extent to which all aspects of Scottish life were permeated and reshaped by empire. The echoes of recent historiographical disputes conducted on a UK-wide level, such as that between Porter and MacKenzie, will be evident to most readers. How, if at all, does the picture change across the twentieth century? Certainly we see, after 1918 and still more after

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century

My aim in this chapter is to explore some issues concerning social memory, commemoration, and the social construction of contemporary identities in the urban arena. By examining the production and iconography of two exhibitionary events in twentieth-century Seville, I want to illuminate the complex connections between debates about the location of Spanish culture, definitions of ‘Spanishness’ and the recasting of the legacy of Spanish imperialism. As a key site within Spanish national mythology and imperial

in Imperial cities
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The relationship between Scotland and the British Empire in the twentieth century was both wide-ranging and highly complex. In the opening year of the century, the Scottish economy was still strongly connected with imperial infrastructures (like railways, engineering, construction and shipping), and colonial trade and investment. The industrial profile of Glasgow was securing a

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century
Scottish emigration in the twentieth century

Scottish emigrants in the eight decades after the First World War matched the numbers who had left between 1815 and 1914. But the contours of intercontinental migration were significantly redrawn during the twentieth century as a consequence of two world wars, ongoing developments in communications technology, and the phenomenon of globalisation, with significant implications for

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century

prudent to distinguish Scotland from Ireland. From the founding of the Union to the middle decades of the twentieth century, most Scots have been enthusiastic participants in the empire. In her seminal account of the origins of modern Britain, Linda Colley argued that ‘trade and Empire, war and military service’ were two bases of an emerging British identity in the 1707–1837 era

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century

eighteenth century, to make known his feelings about corrupt bureaucracies and extravagant habits; and it was thus, not so many years later, that Voltaire used the China that he had been studying from Jesuit historical sources as the setting for a play about freedom from tyranny, the Orphelin de la Chine . The two most significant examples from the twentieth century were probably those by André Malraux in

in Asia in Western fiction
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The Scottish military tradition in decline

implications of that relationship for Scottish society. It would follow therefore that the rapid decline of that empire in the second half of the twentieth century must have wrought profound changes for what we might call the ‘Scottish military establishment’ characterised above all by the Scottish regiments of the British army. And yet an examination of how the Scottish infantry regiments

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century