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Charles E. Curran

the nineteenth century.1 This essay will develop three major points: the dramatic change that occurred with the Catholic acceptance of human rights in the latter part of the twentieth century, the basis and grounding of human rights in contemporary Catholic thought, and a somewhat troubling development in the teaching of Pope John Paul II. A dramatic change The most significant change was the dramatic move from adamant opposition to human rights to strong support for human rights in the second half of the twentieth century. The Catholic Church staunchly opposed human

in Religion and rights
The coronation of 1953
Norman Bonney

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/05/2013, SPi 4 What a day for England! The coronation of 1953 What a day for England and the traditional forces of the world. Shall we ever see like again? ‘Chips Cannon’, Conservative Party MP, quoted by Strong (2005: 490) Shils and Young’s (1953) interpretation of the 1953 coronation is one of the best-known sociological essays about twentieth-century Britain and the nature of social integration and conflict in a large and complex industrial society. It was subject to strong criticism shortly after its publication and has

in Monarchy, religion and the state
Israel as a role model in liberal thought
Uriya Shavit and Ofir Winter

sciences and philosophies, authored studies and novels on Muslim and Arab history from a secularnationalist point of view and vastly contributed to the development of the Arab ethnic national identity; due to his editorial and business skills, his was the most widely circulated of the highbrow journals published by Syrian nationals in Egypt in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.7 In 1913 he published a detailed essay on the history of the Zionist idea and the strategies employed by the Zionist movement (this essay was reprinted six months later by al

in Zionism in Arab discourses
Simon Schama

discovering that he had, all along been speaking Prose, I owned up to my surprise that until deep into the twentieth century almost every great conflict in British history had been in its essence one of religion. That was as true of the seventeenth and the nineteenth century as of the sixteenth and the time of Becket’s murder – and probably truer than any of us liked to admit of the eighteenth as well. For what was the resistance to Jacobitism and the French, around which (Linda Colley tells us) British national identity crystallised, except a visceral paranoid horror of

in Religion and rights
John Anderson

Western Christian tradition engaged with the democratic idea up until the middle of the twentieth century. Particular emphasis will be placed on three elements in this story: the real and imagined Protestant contribution to the evolution of democratic politics; the post-revolutionary Roman Catholic reaction and opposition to democracy; and the mid-twentieth-century Vatican conversion to the merits of democracy. As noted in the introduction, we are concerned here to provide an account of key developments, but also to keep in mind the question of why these particular

in Christianity and democratisation
Pamela Sue Anderson

world of the Enlightenment’.1 Second, this critique undermines Christianity’s relation to a ‘politics of rights’ that, according to Hauerwas, distorted twentieth-century theology with its focus on universal claims for individuals. Third, Hauerwas’s Christianity assumes that faith-community is destroyed by the autonomy of individuals that he finds in the secularising of liberal theology. But, in his terms, the ‘events’ of ‘Babel’ and ‘Pentecost’ reveal a theological remedy for the sin of autonomous individualism: the ‘bodily’ nature of ‘a community of communication’ is

in Religion and rights
Abstract only
Uriya Shavit and Ofir Winter

Conclusion From the early twentieth century through to the Arab Spring, Arab Islamist and liberal thinkers alike have identified the Zionist movement and Israel as enemies, or at least as adversaries – but also as role models that provide examples that should be followed. There is no intrinsic contradiction in the duality of the approach toward the Zionist enterprise; it reflects an ambivalent treatment of the ‘Western other’ in Arab Islamism and liberalism alike. Islamists have perceived the Zionist enterprise as an injustice and a historical distortion, whose

in Zionism in Arab discourses
The state as actor
Ali Riaz

local authorities translate into actions. Globalization has inserted another dimension to this complex interplay between state and communities: foreign policy. The external relations of a state, until the late twentieth century, had very little direct impact on domestic minority politics. In conventional international relations, domestic and foreign policy are distinguished as two separate concepts occupying different terrains, although there is no denying that the values and ideas of the society shape the foreign policy of a country.2 However, it is no longer the

in Islam and identity politics among British-Bangladeshis
Abstract only
Freedom of belief, freedom from belief
John Pritchard, Andrew Brown and Emma Cohen

. Bradford University Centre for Peace Studies produced a major report which concluded that of the thirty-one wars of the twentieth century only three were directly attributable to religion. Usually they were a toxic combination of politics and tribalism. Of the 150 million deaths in the wars of the twentieth century, 75 per cent were the result of four events – World Wars I and II, Stalin’s massacres in Russia and Mao’s in China. None of these conflicts had a major religious component. Indeed only 1 per cent of deaths came from conflicts that did have that component. Of

in Religion and rights
Norman Bonney

century and earlier and continuing manifestations of inter-Christian and religious differences to the present day. Some elements of the oaths such as that for the security of the Presbyterian Church of Scotland and the commitment to exercise law and justice with mercy in all decisions have continued unchanged over 300 years since their inception, but the other elements have had to be adjusted from time to time, mostly without specific legislation, to adapt to other legislation during the preceding reign. A constant theme in these adjustments in the twentieth century was

in Monarchy, religion and the state