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Brian Hoggard

9 Beyond the witch trials Counter-witchcraft and popular magic The archaeology of counter-witchcraft and popular magic Brian Hoggard One aspect of the study of witchcraft and magic, which has not yet been absorbed into the main stream of literature on the subject, is the archaeological record of the subject. Objects such as witch-bottles, dried cats, horse skulls, shoes, written charms and numerous other items have been discovered concealed inside houses in significant quantities from the early modern period until well into the twentieth century. The locations

in Beyond the witch trials
Abstract only
Brian Sudlow

This book is based on a paradox and a coincidence. The paradox is that at the end of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a period of profound secularisation in France, there emerged a generation of Catholic writers and intellectuals who were convinced that the rumours about God’s death had been greatly exaggerated. The coincidence is that, in the same period, English literature too saw a significant revival in Catholic writing. In France, the late novels of Joris Karl Huysmans, the plays of Paul Claudel and the religious

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

In this chapter we will attempt to synthesise some of the most common accounts of the history of secularisation in France and England during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Our aim is to arrive at some understanding of the nature of individual and societal secularisation in England and France, and assess, in spite of the vast differences, what correlations can be drawn between the two countries. This will help us understand more clearly the preoccupations of the French and English Catholic authors and the conditions of belief under which they

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

early twentieth centuries. In the first set of problems we must include the dilemmas of belief and unbelief by which ultimate purposes for action are embraced or rejected. Another issue following logically from this first is that if faith posits God as the ultimate purpose or destiny of human action, in what ways could Catholic literature imaginatively depict the problem of moral autonomy from God? Two additional issues exemplify the dilemmas just raised. First, the theme of homosexuality found in some Catholic writings highlights the

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Open Access (free)
Beyond the witch trials
Owen Davies and Willem de Blécourt

, 1982). 2 Marijke Gijsiwjt and Willem Frijhoff (eds), Nederland betoverd. Toverij en hekserij van de veertiende tot in de twintigste eeuw (Amsterdam, 1987) [published in a reduced English edition as Witchcraft in the Netherlands from the Fourteenth to the Twentieth Century (Rotterdam, 1991)]; Robert Muchembled (ed.), Magie et sorcellerie en Europe du Moyen Age à nos jours (Paris, 1994); Jonathan Barry, Marianne Hester and Gareth Roberts (eds), Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge, 1996); Julian Goodare (ed.), The Scottish Witch-Hunt in Context (Manchester

in Beyond the witch trials
Sabine Doering-Manteuffel and Stephan Bachter

communities.33 From these it is clear 194 Beyond the witch trials that the charm books first printed in Germany during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were still known to the older population of Ohio, though there is little evidence of any preserved copies having survived into the second half of the twentieth century. Research on this subject has only just begun however. Folklorists have, until recently, shown more interest in the oral traditions themselves rather than their possible printed origins.34 One exception is the work of Yvonne Millspaw, who

in Beyond the witch trials
The discourse of spirits in Enlightenment Bristol
Jonathan Barry

that it had all been to lessen the price of the house (10 April), and on 15 May he again noted that one of the Haynes family was ‘very angry’ over the affair and added, ‘May the Lord prepare me for calumny.’ Dyer’s own employers, the leading Presbyterian merchants Ames and Bright, were very distrustful of Giles and ‘interrogated’ him concerning the matter both on 5 February and on 22 June. It seems likely that this explanation, which remained the standard sceptical explanation into the twentieth century,38 was formulated very early on, since Durbin’s narrative notes

in Beyond the witch trials
Open Access (free)
A late eighteenth-century Dutch witch doctor and his clients
Willem de Blécourt

), 285–303; Owen Davies, Cunning-Folk: Popular Magic in English History (London, 2003), ch. 7. For some examples of other 166 Beyond the witch trials Dutch cunning-folk operating in the period see de Blécourt, ‘Four Centuries of Frisian Witch Doctors’, in Marijke Gijswijt-Hofstra and Willem Frijhoff (eds), Witchcraft in the Netherlands from the Fourteenth to the Twentieth Century (Rotterdam, 1991), pp. 161– 2. 3 The dossiers used for my description and analysis can be consulted at the Rijksarchief of Drenthe: Archief Etstoel 9, doss. 437 and Etstoel 32, doss. 486

in Beyond the witch trials
Author: Brian Sudlow

This book is a comparative study of the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, this book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes which are considered to be emblematic of the Catholic literature.

Brian Sudlow

usefully framed as ways of envisaging the reconciliation of humanity with God and itself. In spite of Benson’s taste for State coercion, this way of reading sainthood and suffering is perhaps most clearly exemplified by his novels. Between the conditions of unbelief and the inconsistencies of the anti-secularists we are left with the challenge of summing up what secularisation theory can reveal to us about French and English Catholic writings in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Fundamentally, this literature does not depict a

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914