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The visual art of Tim Robinson/Timothy Drever

a new audience began to appear, especially as artists like Aloysius O’Kelly honed in on the dignity and the hardships endured by Irish peasants in such paintings as Mass in a Connemara Cabin.12 By the early twentieth century, and with growing momentum following the Irish War of Independence and the establishment of the Free State, the West of Ireland and its occupants became the practical equivalent in visual art terms of the figure of Éire with her harp and wolfhound as a symbol of Irishness.13 Yvonne Scott has pointed out that in the counties of the western

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
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agreement that would produce labour peace. During this era wages rose, economic growth was consistent, 14 and the United States developed a modern welfare state and saw major investment by the federal government in highways, mortgages and the infrastructure of suburbanization. This in turn helped to vault vast numbers of working-class white Americans into the middle class. This economic form of social contract was replicated across post-war Europe in different ways and to different degrees. While very different, both of these notions of the social contract

in The spatial contract
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The geographical imagination of Tim Robinson

source of information: ‘Sean was at the door of his house as I came by, and I turned in to thank him and to drink my tea. I asked him to check all the placenames I had scribbled on my map and make sure I had them all in the right positions, which he did most scrupulously’. See Pilgrimage, 119. 48 Robinson, Connemara Gazetteer, 43, 60, 67, 78. Elsewhere in Ireland naming has marked military setbacks involving Irish regiments, such as the battles of Spion Kop (Boer War), or Balaclava (Crimea) or Gallipoli (WW1). A marshy field in Tipperary was named Falklands by the

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
The case for practice theory

shifting temporalities in everyday life. The contours of cartographic theory sketched out In this section, cartographic theory is laid out in brief to provide a context against which to situate the value of a practice theory of digital maps. Full histories of cartographic theory have been written elsewhere, with Perkins (2003), Edney (2005) and Crampton (2010) each providing excellent overviews. In summary, cartography has existed for millennia, and in various forms. However, cartographic theory emerged only immediately prior to the Second World War, largely through the

in Time for mapping
Landscape, mobility and politics after the crash

identity. But these tailored articulations of the past also had a much broader function in the boom-time discourse on modernisation that surrounded the motorway. Susan Sontag has noted that heroic national figures are chosen for one purpose only – ideological mobilisation (Sontag, 1970). Other examples of this fusion of memory politics with the progressive discourse of growth include the legal re-assertion of the Irish language in the 2003 Official Languages Act and the state funeral in 2001 of the disinterred remains of Irish War of Independence hero, Kevin Barry. In

in Spacing Ireland
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Creating places of vernacular democracy

resources, making them available at the same time. These include Schöneberger Südgelände, Park am Gleisdreieck in Berlin, Port Sunlight City wastelands Figure 3.1  Map of Warsaw in Liverpool or the Warsaw Praska Ścieżka Rowerowa [Praga Cycling Route] through the Vistula marshy meadows. Warsaw still has a relatively great number of wastelands as a result of its uneven development following the destruction of the Second World War, industrial collapse, absorption of agricultural lands as well as changes connected with railway infrastructure, etc. Many of these areas have

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
The restructuring of work in Germany

-responsible individuals, sees a mutually constitutive relationship between state and market. The intellectual tradition of Ordo-liberalism that is credited with the building of a post-war ‘Soziale Marktwirtschaft’ (social market economy), provides a set of concepts and understandings that can be invoked to bring the market into the realm of political intervention and social dialogue.5 Writing from the time of the crises of the 1930s, the Ordo-liberals sought to critique laissez-faire liberalism, arguing that a social market economy required protective social institutions to be created

in Globalisation contested
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Postcolonialism and ecology in the work of Tim Robinson

, Robinson provides a telling portrait of one such domicile and property on the outskirts of Roundstone. Despite the background of the Land War across the 1880s, the property encountered by Robinson here seems to indicate a family enjoying prosperity during this time of struggle and impoverishment: The mansion, unostentatious and comfortably-off in appearance, that Henry Robinson built in 1885 on a rise above the road just beyond the northern limits of Roundstone village must have been a more commanding presence in that era of cottages and hovels, until it was hidden from

in Unfolding Irish landscapes

and object, nature and culture, between body and map and indeed between time and space; the geometric logic propagating taxation, territory, terror, war and frontier (Lacoste, 1973). Yet on the other hand, as Newling’s bewilderment attests to, maps and mappings continue to disorientate and perplex. The chronologically ritualistic choreographies between bodies and cartographies, between satellite navigation devices and world-weary drivers, for example, manifestly complicates any straightforward division between maps and their users, or between representation and the

in Time for mapping

historic European cities. The virtues of the European city are emphasised by its mix of uses, walkability, and focus on public transportation. Furthermore, with increased levels of competition, cities have sought to develop high-profile iconic buildings designed by star architects, such as the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao by Frank Gehry, or the Imperial War Museum in Manchester by Daniel Libeskind. The development of such buildings acts both as a feature of differentiation, in that through a unique design they stand out from their surroundings and help the city develop a

in Spacing Ireland