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C. E. Beneš

because the city of Genoa was in some measure a Roman port. For when the Romans wished to send a navy into Africa or Spain they assembled at the port of Genoa. For this reason the same Titus Livy, in his second part 19 where he discusses the Second Punic War between the Romans and the Carthaginians, says this: in the 534th year from the founding of the City , Publius Cornelius Scipio was at Marseilles with his ships

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

: ‘From which of these men is a woman giving off such a scent?’ And when he identified him, he said: ‘It offends me that you are called a man, since I know that to be false by your scent’. 45 Finally, citizens ought not to be subject to wantonness, but practised in virtuous and warlike deeds. For the art of war is learned better through experience than through knowledge, better through habit than

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

major defeat on the Genoese in the War of Saint Sabas, fought in the Holy Land in 1256–58, the situation quickly improved for the Genoese after they assisted Michael VIII Palaiologos to regain Constantinople from the French and their Venetian allies, who had occupied it since the Fourth Crusade in 1204. 33 Michael's gratitude gave the Genoese a major advantage over the Venetians in trade with Constantinople and into

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

city ( civitas ), but a town ( oppidum ). 4 For a town is a kind of fortified settlement ( castrum ), so-called either from the opposition ( oppositio ) of its walls or from the wealth ( ops )—that is, the riches—which are stored there for safekeeping in time of war. 5 On this subject Titus Livy says that a certain African named Mago suddenly seized and

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Genoese. 18 In the year of the Lord 1146 the Genoese armed twenty-six galleys and many ships carrying [war] machines, with one hundred knights and their warhorses. Then they went to Minorca and besieged it for twenty-two days. But then as winter was arriving they returned to Genoa with many spoils. They sailed around the entire island seizing lands, killing Saracens, and carrying

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

Ages went on. Royal letters of protection were a kind of ‘internal passport’ or safe-conduct, guaranteeing that the bearer was a reputable person on bona fide business. Typical recipients included foreign merchants, soldiers en route to or from the wars and various kinds of pilgrim and religious mendicant. Hermits, of course, fell into the latter category. The patent rolls record the issuing of letters of protection. The

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

. 10 On Venus: Bede, Expositio Actuum apostolorum for Acts 7.43, p. 36; Scarfe Beckett ( 2008 ), pp. 125–38. On Saturn: Landolfus Sagax, Historia romana 1.1, p. 3. On Mercury: this probably refers to Cisalpine Gaul (northern Italy), since classical texts regularly characterise Gauls as Mercury-worshippers (e.g. Caesar, Gallic war 6

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Clotilde, often preached the faith of Christ to him, although he did not wish to listen to her. 16 But it happened that he got into a serious war with the Alamanni, and when he was losing a battle he vowed a vow, saying, ‘God of my wife, help me and I will worship you as God’. As soon as he had made this vow, he regained his powers against the enemy and achieved victory, and so afterward he

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

–1. 24 The church of Santi Nazario e Celso is attested in a document of 987, which describes it as ‘the basilica of Saint Nazarius which was founded along the seashore in the place called Albaro known as “to the holy pilgrims”’; Cartario genovese , p. 27. The church was demolished for the construction of Corso Italia after World War I

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

. 3e. Commission to enclose Christine Holby, 1447 The longest of the documents in this section, and the most involved enquiry, was prompted by an unusual case. When Christine Holby, a refugee from the priory of Kildare in war-torn Ireland, turned up in Exeter declaring her intention to become an anchorite, the bishop, Edmund Lacy, had more than the usual range of questions to consider. As well as satisfying

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550