Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 45 items for :

  • Catholic women religious x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
Clear All
Abstract only
The material and visual culture of the Stuart Courts, 1589–1619
Author: Jemma Field

This book analyses Anna of Denmark’s material and visual patronage at the Stuart courts, examining her engagement with a wide array of expressive media including architecture, garden design, painting, music, dress, and jewellery. Encompassing Anna’s time in Denmark, England, and Scotland, it establishes patterns of interest and influence in her agency, while furthering our knowledge of Baltic-British transfer in the early modern period. Substantial archival work has facilitated a formative re-conceptualisation of James and Anna’s relationship, extended our knowledge of the constituents of consortship in the period, and has uncovered evidence to challenge the view that Anna followed the cultural accomplishments of her son, Prince Henry. This book reclaims Anna of Denmark as the influential and culturally active royal woman that her contemporaries knew. Combining politics, culture, and religion across the courts of Denmark, Scotland, and England, it enriches our understanding of royal women’s roles in early modern patriarchal societies and their impact on the development of cultural modes and fashions. This book will be of interest to upper level undergraduate and postgraduate students taking courses on early modern Europe in the disciplines of Art and Architectural History, English Literature, Theatre Studies, History, and Gender Studies. It will also attract a wide range of academics working on early modern material and visual culture, and female patronage, while members of the public who enjoy the history of courts and the British royals will also find it distinctively appealing.

Der Blaue Reiter and its legacies
Author: Dorothy Price

This book presents new research on the histories and legacies of the German Expressionist group, Der Blaue Reiter, the founding force behind modernist abstraction. For the first time Der Blaue Reiter is subjected to a variety of novel inter-disciplinary perspectives, ranging from a philosophical enquiry into its language and visual perception, to analyses of its gender dynamics, its reception at different historical junctures throughout the twentieth century, and its legacies for post-colonial aesthetic practices. The volume offers a new perspective on familiar aspects of Expressionism and abstraction, taking seriously the inheritance of modernism for the twenty-first century in ways that will help to recalibrate the field of Expressionist studies for future scholarship. Der Blaue Reiter still matters, the contributors argue, because the legacies of abstraction are still being debated by artists, writers, philosophers and cultural theorists today.

Questioning gender roles
Brigitte Rollet

it is certainly the case that unlike their British counterparts French princes and princesses not only ‘live happily ever after’, but also ‘have many children’ (ils vécurent heureux et eurent beaucoup d’enfants). The influence of this powerful ideology of motherhood should not be underestimated. Is there, one can ask, any alternative for French women to the historically accepted and conventional function of women as mothers, considering the importance of the indirect propaganda in this regard (be it political or religious), and

in Coline Serreau
The moral life and the state
Jeff Rosen

dialogue in the public sphere about that very 79 80 Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘fancy subjects’ subject, Weaver argued Cameron’s private devotions were sufficient to explain the impetus for her religious imagery. In a circular fashion, Weaver used her religious photographs to confirm that very devotion. Because Cameron called photography a ‘divine art’ and urged her husband and children to believe in God, Weaver presumed that Cameron obediently and reflexively also complied with what he called ‘the accepted role for women Anglo-Catholics’ by articulating a one

in Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘fancy subjects’
Abstract only
Jemma Field

told him that she desired no more for the regulation of her household than his mother Queen Anne enjoyed.’3 Unlike Anna’s entourage, however, Henrietta Maria’s French, Catholic contingent were considered an obstacle to her assimilation and marital concord, being blamed for several ‘misdemeanours’ and for ‘ill craftie counsells’.4 As a result, despite Henrietta Maria’s wishes – and Stuart precedent – Charles determined ‘to be master’ and expelled the French entourage.5 This was a move motivated by personal, political, and religious considerations: it showcased his

in Anna of Denmark
Jemma Field

multiple confessional positions – including the ‘church papist’ – in early modern England, moving religious studies beyond the basic Protestant/Catholic divide.86 What commonly remains a blanket assumption, however, is that early modern women – irrespective of which religion they conformed to – were deeply, studiously, pious. This, of course, was true of many in the period, as private writings attest, but as Bernard Capp has demonstrated of ordinary women, it was not true of them all.87 Yet a different caution needs to be exercised when considering royal women, for we

in Anna of Denmark
Abstract only
Jemma Field

inherently subjective, so that notions of what Spanish fashion or Lutheranism looked like varied from court to court and region to region but also from individual to individual. Nevertheless, modern scholars have been quick to assign labels to early modern identities – whether that be religious, national, or dynastic – and they are too often applied in oppositional binaries. Thus, an early modern person was either Catholic or Protestant, Spanish or English, Medici or Habsburg. The tendency to binarise, rather than capture the labile, palimpsestic, and multiple nature of

in Anna of Denmark
Abstract only
Coline Serreau and politics (1972–96)
Brigitte Rollet

change, while only one seems convinced – even if she sounds as if she were trying to convince herself – that women should accept their lot which is to have and raise children. Be they farmers, working class, middle class, porn actress, anorexic, caretaker or retired pastor, they all illustrate a form of oppression and repression, either economic, sexual, physical or religious. Some can name and identify it while others would probably be surprised if told that their claims are the same as the MLF’s. None is a self-confessed feminist

in Coline Serreau
Caroline Turner and Jen Webb

-generated vision of the effects of a nuclear holocaust in a potential new war between the two Koreas.6 In the Indian subcontinent artists have confronted civil and religious violence and potential conflict, including nuclear conflict, between India and Pakistan, an example being the works of Salima Hashmi and Nalini Malani, discussed in Chapter  5. Japanese artists have been in the forefront of those who have produced images about war and conflict. An example is Yoko Ono, who experienced the firebombing of Tokyo and was deeply affected by the dropping of the atomic bombs on

in Art and human rights
Abstract only
Amy Bryzgel

Artists from the West should constantly thank God that they were spared the experience that artists from former socialist countries had. — Natalia LL, 2015 The issue of gender, not to mention feminism, in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe remains complicated and fraught. Prior to 1989, the ‘woman question’ was largely considered to have been resolved throughout the region on an official level, with gender equality a stated priority of socialist governments. 1 Across the East, women benefited from equal access to jobs, childcare and often equal pay

in Performance art in Eastern Europe since 1960