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For the love of God

The subject of love has taken the secular advent of the second wave of feminism to create the occasion to hear substantial numbers of women’s voices enter the theological discursive fray, thus challenging the universality of the claims of man.54 Thus, the past thirty years or so, have seen women from within various religious traditions return to sacred texts to inquire after woman, to sort ideology from theology, particularly patriarchal ideology, and to address what is perhaps the most urgent of questions: What is the nature of the relationship between women and

in The subject of love
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In the spirit of the gift of love

at the end of Chapter 2. In more general terms, this book offers a consistent critique of the gender-blindness that has defined many religious traditions and much religious language. 2 Questions concerning the existence and nature of God, somewhat ironically, have found a champion in the work of a number of prominent French thinkers, including Jacques Derrida, a scholar whose work is more typically, if falsely, accused of issuing the death certificate on God, and the Catholic philosopher Jean-Luc Marion. They are but two of a growing list of philosophers whose work

in The subject of love
Love

sympathy with, or colludes with, Hannah as a Christ-​like figure. While Hannah is not a practising Catholic, she is fully knowledgeable about it –​‘I have known my Bible well for many years’21 –​and would appear to accept Catholicism, such that her actions take place within the context of her religious belief, since she does not seriously question God’s existence, nor the existence and validity of the Church, as we saw Judith Hearne do in both those instances. In this sense we are back with Venichka in Moscow–​Petushki, and possibly Francis Phelan in Ironweed, as they

in The Existential drinker
Open Access (free)

back to the centre. Though these paradigms are useful, I have long felt uneasy at their failure to account for disjunctures and contradictions that play themselves out, I would suggest, in a context of local differences that have little to do with the metropolitan centre. An example I examine in this book is the history of the Shakers, or Spiritual Baptists, a religious practice with its roots in the

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Fugitive souls and free spirits

moments she steps outside of the religious version of her life and calls such a reading the ‘sad’ reading, an ‘error, for there are no women like Helen. Helen is no symbol of lost anything, wrong-​road-​taken kind of person, if-​only-​knew-​then kind of person’,15 and every step of the way has been the result of her own free will. Fighting the religious view that has been inculcated in her by a Catholic upbringing, and reckoning the accumulation of sins in her life, she insists that they should be called ‘decisions’, not sins, and hence ‘she has no compulsion to confess

in The Existential drinker

of national victimhood, prominent public roles for religious organisations, constriction of women's public participation, demographic panics about ethnic majorities, and weakened reproductive rights – after state socialism collapsed (Verdery 1994 : 250). Racism and xenophobia against Roma, Jews, other minorities and historic ethnic Others, plus undocumented migrants crossing into the EU, were another dimension of postsocialist ‘nation-building’ (Bošković 2006 : 560), creating what the Slovenian sociologist Tonči Kuzmanić ( 2002 : 21) termed a ‘new … post

in Race and the Yugoslav region

religious structures, from the late fourteenth century, shaped its migration history in many ways (Sugar 1977 ; Hoare 2007 ; Wachtel 2008 ). Authorities directly settled Anatolian Turkish cavalrymen on conquered land as ‘timariots’ who taxed local peasants and raised troops, while Ottoman trade-routes developed towns like Sarajevo and Thessaloniki into provincial capitals, refuges for many Sephardic Jews expelled from Spain in 1492. The Ottoman politics of conversion to Islam, necessary for South Slavs and other Catholic/Orthodox Christians seeking bureaucratic

in Race and the Yugoslav region
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An epilogue

, abstract reason and religious truth, and governmental authority and popular politics. There are parallels here with modernist initiatives elsewhere. On the other hand, South Asian endeavors equally sieved such concerns through distinct expressions of modernism, at once querying the colonial connection with a (generally bourgeois) modern, articulating the national dynamic with an (often avant

in Subjects of modernity
Rousseau’s and nationalism

Corsicans – made him an obvious choice for a people in search for a constitutional engineer. The situation was, on the face of it, much the same in Poland. In 1771 Rousseau was asked by Count Michel Wielhorski (an otherwise completely undistinguished Polish nobleman) to present a similar proposal for Poland following the accession to the throne of Stanislaw II, one of Catherine the Great’s former lovers.4 Wielhorski had been requested to seek information about the constitution by members of the Confédération of the Bar (a group of Catholic noblemen) who had revolted

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

developments.) They never intended it to happen in this way. The scientists who reacted against clerical reaction and supposition were not what Rousseau was later to term ‘evangelists of atheism’ (Stiebing 1993: 32). Rather they were Godfearing men of considerable theological sophistication. Isaac Newton wrote more about theology than about mathematics; Mendel, the father of modern genetics, was a pious monk; Blaise Pascal was a religious thinker more than a mathematician and a physicist; Johannes Kepler was a mystic as well as an astronomer, as was Copernicus. Nicolas Steno

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau