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Reorganizing leprosy care, 1890– 1900
Stephen Snelders

Surinamese confinement policies and the necessity for an accommodation between the dominant Christian religious groups in the colony (Protestants and Catholics) and with the colonial state. A symbiotic alliance for leprosy care had formed between the colonial state and the Catholics earlier in the nineteenth century. However, at the end of the nineteenth century, this alliance was renegotiated within the transforming landscape of Surinamese society to incorporate Protestants as well. The reorganization of leprosy care in the colony was intended to establish a better

in Leprosy and colonialism
Carol Helmstadter

, women who worked for a wage. Women were thought intellectually and physically inferior to men, and if the woman was a lady she had a special mission – she should be high-minded, more religious, and if married, totally dedicated to motherhood and submissive to her husband. Women also had to be directed by women, as Golding indicated, and it was inappropriate for ladies to interact with men in the public sphere of which hospitals, and especially the all male military hospitals, were a part. A later chapter will demonstrate that this British convention did not obtain in

in Beyond Nightingale
A feminist analysis of the Neary and Halappanavar cases
Joan McCarthy

(eventually removed in 1973). In practice, these restrictions meant that many thousands of Irish women were, effectively, forced to have large families until the (restricted) legalisation of contraception in 1980. The Harding Clark Report indicates that the Catholic religious sisters, the Medical Missionaries of Mary (MMMs), who ran Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital until 1997, regularly appealed to Church laws and doctrine and consulted various clergymen on clinical issues that raised moral worries for them. On the matter of hysterectomies, they were, in fact, out of step with

in Ethical and legal debates in Irish healthcare
Carol Helmstadter

Introduction The Sisters of Mercy, who made up twenty-three of the Roman Catholic Sisters, produced the largest number of highly efficient nurses in the British army hospitals. There were a number of reasons why the religious nurses were so outstanding. Sisterhoods had a special appeal to ladies who wished to make better use of their talents because they provided a way for competent women to respectably reject the doctrine of female subordination and break out of the domestic sphere. As religious Sisters, ladies

in Beyond Nightingale
Carol Helmstadter

Introduction Of the three systems of nursing used in the Crimean War, government-imposed, nursing sisterhoods, and doctor-directed nursing, religious Sisters were obviously the most successful as a group. However, British Roman Catholic Sisters had a particularly difficult time because of the long-standing anti-Catholic tradition in Britain. Anti-Catholicism also impacted the new Anglican Sisters because they were often mistakenly identified with Catholic nuns. The French and Piedmont-Sardinian Daughters of

in Beyond Nightingale
Jacques Gélis

of dealing with this paradox in a religious culture that nurtured representations and cults of the body was to draw a clear line between the popular conception of women’s wombs and reproductive faculties on the one hand and that of the viscera and digestive faculties on the other. That some saints were charged with curing specific digestive and intestine afflictions is a manifestation of the ways in which the Catholic Church moralised bodily practices and beliefs by creating a realm of associations and analogies around the workings of the entrails as distinct from

in Bellies, bowels and entrails in the eighteenth century
Ruth Fletcher

2 Conscientious objection, harm reduction and abortion care Ruth Fletcher Introduction The scope of any legal right to refuse to provide abortion care merits particular consideration following the introduction of the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act 2013 (PLDPA). Irish health scholarship and practice may benefit from an account of conscientious objection (CO) that clarifies when CO is legitimately engaged by a refusal to provide care and whether CO is limited given its potential effect as a barrier to women’s lawful access to abortion. This chapter

in Ethical and legal debates in Irish healthcare
Abstract only
Myth and reality
Carol Helmstadter

outcry over the ten Catholic nuns in Nightingale’s original party and articles appeared in the press accusing Nightingale of Romanist and/or High Church sympathies. In the same month of December 1854, Wheeler’s letter was causing more adverse publicity around the issue of whether women should be in military hospitals at all. The Bracebridges feared that the whole project of female nursing was about to collapse. The Times published an article on 9 January 1855 reporting that unless religious dissensions could be reconciled this was a strong possibility. 28

in Beyond Nightingale
Abstract only
Transcending the limitations of gender
Carol Helmstadter

introduce a small group of six nurses with Jane Shaw Stewart as superintendent at the military hospital in Netley. The British army nurse corps would develop slowly from this small beginning, but Nightingale herself had no legitimate control over the new military nurses although she could exercise some moral influence. The religious sisterhoods provided topflight nursing services, but in a secularizing world they would later find it difficult to recruit enough women to provide services on the scale they did in the Crimean War. The Piedmont

in Beyond Nightingale
The Irish perspective
Oonagh Walsh

– calm, discreet, self-sacrificing – were broadly the same in Ireland as in Britain. But there was one significant difference that further undermined the status of the Irish asylum nurse. When nursing became an acceptable vocation for women, it was less the respectable middle classes seeking independence who flocked to the profession, and rather more women in religious orders who flooded into hospitals and institutions for the sick. The firm hold that the Catholic Church would exert on Irish society only began in the post-Famine years: prior to 1850, society in general

in Mental health nursing