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Gothic Bodies and Diabetes

The diabetic body can be mapped as a profoundly Gothic landscape, referencing theories of the monstrous, the uncanny and the abject. Diabetes is revealed under what Foucault has termed the medical gaze, where the body becomes a contested site, its ownership questioned by the repeated invasion of medical procedures. As an invisible chronic illness, diabetic lifestyle is positioned in relation to issues of control, transformation, and the abnormal normal. Translating the Gothic trope of the outsider into medical and social realms, the diabetic body is seen as the Othered body ceaselessly striving to attain perfection through blood purification rituals. This essay examines how diabetes is portrayed in film and fine art practice from the filmic approach to diabetes as dramatic trope to fine art techniques that parallel ethnographic and sociological approaches to chronic illness.

Gothic Studies

literary vampire; one of these, the Byronic, though born in that Romanticism, is still very much a presence in contemporary vampire texts. In this chapter I will show the evolution of the Byronic vampire as it mutated from its folkloric roots, as documented in the ethnography of the likes of Tournefort, into a powerful literary figure. I will also show that, as this archetype evolved, it did so through an

in Open Graves, Open Minds
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were, at first, primarily ethnographical. They commonly depict the peasantry as deluded by superstition, with priests often cast as a harmful and venial source of this contagion. Yet the portrait is not necessarily disparaging; often the people have all the ambiguous integrity and simplicity of the ‘noble savage’. In these accounts, the vampire – almost always itself a peasant – becomes a

in Open Graves, Open Minds
Directions and redirections

social control, and its valuation of ordinary viewers, an attention to new modes of delivery and interaction with television drama will develop the research into reception conducted in some of the essays in this book and in other ethnographic studies of the audiences of popular television drama. One aspect of this research will concern the segmentation of audiences, and how different audience groups enjoy and understand programmes differently. In fact, television drama means different things for different audiences. There are generational differences between the

in Popular television drama
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local, as Chow points out in her insightful analysis of film as ethnography ( 2010a : 148–71 ) utilising Mulvey’s now iconic essay on gender and power in Hollywood cinema, ‘Visual pleasure and narrative cinema’. While the return to the past in Japanese cinema of the 1950s and 1960s functioned as a form of reimagining of national identity outside of the contaminating influence of Western forms, tied up

in Globalgothic
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Writing popular culture in colonial Punjab, 1885– 1905

instance by tracing the interest in ‘classical’ Punjab and its survivals in the work of Punjab’s first colonial archaeological survey, which also collected anthropological and ethnographical material. It then looks at three different types of overlapping evidence of Punjabi literary culture in English through the ‘collecting’ of folklore, the adaptation and translation of children’s tales, and the curation and translation of Punjabi lyrics. Excavating cultures: colonial mythologies in Punjab In 2013

in Interventions
Representing organ trafficking in Asian cinemas

-59 . Scheper-Hughes , Nancy. 2002 . ‘The ends of the body: Commodity fetishism and the global traffic in organs’ . SAIS Review 22 ( 1 ): 61-80 . Scheper-Hughes , Nancy. 2004 . ‘Parts unknown: Undercover ethnography of the organs-trafficking underworld’ . Ethnography

in Neoliberal Gothic
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Zombies and the spectre of cultural decline

– White Zombie (1932) and I Walked with a Zombie (1943), to name two of the better known – the figure belongs to the exotic ethnography of the Caribbean, and reflects little about American culture except its fascination with empire and discomfort with the legacy of slavery. With Romero’s film, however, the zombie arrives freighted with the very pressing issues of the American

in The Gothic and death
Towards a globalised notion of vampire identity

. ‘Striking Samburu and a mad cow: Adventures in Anthropollywood’. In OffStage/On Display: Intimacy and Ethnography in the Age of Public Culture , ed. Andrew Shryock. Stanford: Stanford University Press , 31–68 . Bakardjieva , Maria . 2007 . ‘Virtual togetherness: An everyday-life perspective’ . In The Cybercultures Reader , eds David Bell and Barbara M. Kennedy

in Globalgothic
Women, domesticity and the female Gothic adaptation on television

), ‘ Someone’s trying to kill me and I think it’s my husband ’, in J. Fleenor (ed.), The Female Gothic, Montreal : Eden . Seiter , E. ( 1989 ), ‘ Don’t treat us like we’re so stupid and naive: towards an ethnography of soap opera viewers ’, in E. Seiter et al. (eds), Remote Control: Television, Audiences and Cultural Power, London : Routledge and Kegan Paul . Spigel , L. and D. Mann ( 1992 ), Private Screenings: Television and the Female Consumer, Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press . Thornham , S. ( 1994 ), ‘ Feminist

in Popular television drama