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An epilogue
Saurabh Dube

imaginary but palpable distended and aggrandizing West/Europe as modernity – for all those awaiting its second coming in prior places, anachronistic spaces, lagging in time. In artistic, intellectual, and aesthetic arenas, modernism(s) in South Asia have variously, often critically, engaged with these projections and presuppositions: but they have also been unable to easily escape

in Subjects of modernity
Peter J. Verovšek

, ‘ Public Discourse and Cosmopolitan Political Identity: Imagining the European Union Citizen ,’ Futures , 38 ( 2006 ), 139 . By stifling imagination and the ability to fantasise [ Phantasie ], which is crucial to creating new structures that go beyond the nation-state, the EU is dooming its own project. 30 S. Benhabib , The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt ( Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield , 2003 ), xliv ; H. Arendt , ‘ Approaching the German Question ,’ in Jerome Kohn (ed), Essays in Understanding, 1930–1954 ( New York : Harcourt, Brace & Co

in Memory and the future of Europe
Open Access (free)
Antinomies and enticements
Saurabh Dube

that the developmental idea of a supersession of the past is crucial to modern imaginaries. This is true of academic assumption and everyday understanding, and also underlies the mutual articulations of modernity, modernization, and modernism. Such splitting of the past from the present is simultaneously temporal and spatial. Here the singular temporal trajectory and the exclusive spatial location of

in Subjects of modernity
Thomas Osborne

Culturalisms – Truth – Enlightenment and autonomy – Reason – Norms of modernism – Culture, creativity and reflexivity – Institutionalisation versus reflexivity – Simmel: an excursus – The antinomy of culture This chapter seeks to get clear of – if hardly to refute – various understandings of culture so as to make way for the conception of the scope of modern cultural theory which is to animate our treatment here. The first section – Culturalisms – is, then, largely about what modern cultural theory is not. It attempts only to lay the basic

in The structure of modern cultural theory
Peter J. Verovšek

, Essays in Understanding , 391; also Benhabib, The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt , 86–95. For more on the connection between Arendt and Habermas, see P. J. Verovšek , ‘ A Case of Communicative Learning: Rereading Habermas’s Philosophical Project through an Arendtian Lens ,’ Polity , 51 : 3 ( 2019 ), 597 –627 . 22 Frank, Constituent Moments , ch. 1. 23 Verovšek, ‘Unexpected Support for European Integration,’ 389–413. 24 H. Arendt , On Revolution ( New York : Penguin Classics , 1990 ), 204 . 25 S. Benhabib , ‘ Democratic Exclusions and

in Memory and the future of Europe
Anastasia Marinopoulou

 8 1 3 Modernism and postmodernism O gentlemen, the time of life is short! … If life did ride upon a dial’s point, Still ending at the arrival of an hour. And if we live, we live to tread on kings. William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 1 5.2.82–​7. So we should not expect Foucault to give us a philosophical theory that deploys … notions. Still, philosophy is more than theories. ‘Foucault and Epistemology’ by Richard Rorty in David Couzens Hoy (ed.), Foucault: A Critical Reader1 Introduction Foucault: the catcher in the modern rye When discussing modernity, one

in Critical theory and epistemology
Peter J. Verovšek

. Sznaider , ‘ Memory Unbound: The Holocaust and the Formation of Cosmopolitan Memory ,’ European Journal of Social Theory , 5 : 1 ( 2002 ); N. G. Finkelstein , The Holocaust Industry: Reflection on the Exploitation of Jewish Suffering ( New York : Verso , 2000 ). 41 S. Benhabib , The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt ( Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield , 2003 ), 92 . 42 J. Winter , Dreams of Peace and Freedom: Utopian Moments in the Twentieth Century ( New Haven : Yale University Press , 2006 ). 43 Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of

in Memory and the future of Europe
Open Access (free)
An introduction
Saurabh Dube

see, all of this shores up, as well, what the work might contribute to discussions of modernity after so much has been said and written about the subject. Primary matters It warrants emphasis that the conditions of possibility for this work lie in a series of critical questions concerning modernity, history, and the West/Europe, which have been raised by distinct perspectives

in Subjects of modernity
Thomas Osborne

population, served to undermine or discredit the idea that life itself might be the object of an art. Life instead became a matter of government, or what Foucault was later to call ‘governmentality’. From pastoralism to bio-power, life has become amenable to management. Hence cue, now, aesthetics of existence and their (albeit sparse) latter-day progeny. For Foucault insists that the idea of an aesthetics of existence in the modern world – as it reappeared after antiquity in the European Renaissance – functions as a kind of implicit, if fragmented and periodic

in The structure of modern cultural theory
On social systems and societal constitutions
Darrow Schecter

compelled, for the most part, to accept the separation of the ministry of the economy/​treasury from the de facto power of an independent central bank in their respective countries, not to mention the power of the European Central Bank within the eurozone. One obvious risk is the regression towards a personalised and discretionary exercise of power that is likely to ensue if newly articulated and durable compromises cannot be established across a range of national, systemic, and environmental boundaries. To some degree, this is certainly a question of fairer income

in Critical theory and sociological theory