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Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation

, touting their objects as mass-produced, portable units to be shipped and deployed anywhere in the world. In this mixture of engineering, industrial design and entrepreneurship, innovation is very much the driving force, with its concern for profitability and universality. Innovation, however, is not the same as architecture. One might point out that certain generations of architectural modernism fall into the same trap of mechanistic and homogenised mass solutions, yet this

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

–machine interface ( Halpern, 2014 ). Now a defining feature of late-modernity, this exclusion shaped early computer programming. Politically, it found a reflection in the counter-cultural anticipation of artificial intelligence as a means of undermining the professional hierarchies of modernism. Computers would, it was argued, allow the design capabilities and expertise of professionals to be transferred to the popular masses ( Turner, 2006 ). In the mid 1970s, the architect Nicholas Negroponte 11 sought to eliminate professional privilege by facilitating public

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Social and cultural modernity beyond the nation-state

German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has written extensively on the European Union. This is the only in-depth account of his project. Published now in a second edition to coincide with the celebration of his ninetieth birthday, a new preface considers Habermas’s writings on the eurozone and refugee crises, populism and Brexit, and the presidency of Emmanuel Macron.

Placing an emphasis on the conception of the EU that informs Habermas’s political prescriptions, the book is divided into two main parts. The first considers the unfolding of 'social modernity' at the level of the EU. Among the subjects covered are Habermas's concept of juridification, the latter's affinities with integration theories such as neofunctionalism, and the application of Habermas's democratic theory to the EU. The second part addresses 'cultural modernity' in Europe – 'Europessimism' is argued to be a subset of the broader cultural pessimism that assailed the project of modernity in the late twentieth century, and with renewed intensity in the years since 9/11.

Interdisciplinary in approach, this book engages with European/EU studies, critical theory, political theory, international relations, intellectual history, comparative literature, and philosophy. Concise and clearly written, it will be of interest to students, scholars and professionals with an interest in these disciplines, as well as to a broader readership concerned with the future of Europe

Prisoners of the past

This book examines the impact that nostalgia has had on the Labour Party’s political development since 1951. In contrast to existing studies that have emphasised the role played by modernity, it argues that nostalgia has defined Labour’s identity and determined the party’s trajectory over time. It outlines how Labour, at both an elite and a grassroots level, has been and remains heavily influenced by a nostalgic commitment to an era of heroic male industrial working-class struggle. This commitment has hindered policy discussion, determined the form that the modernisation process has taken and shaped internal conflict and cohesion. More broadly, Labour’s emotional attachment to the past has made it difficult for the party to adjust to the socioeconomic changes that have taken place in Britain. In short, nostalgia has frequently left the party out of touch with the modern world. In this way, this book offers an assessment of Labour’s failures to adapt to the changing nature and demands of post-war Britain.

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Modernity, welfare state and Eutopia

‘Flow and boundary’ – a suggestive image for a new constellation of border crossings. (Habermas, 2001 ) 1 From its conception to the referenda of 2005 where it met its end, German philosopher Jürgen Habermas wrote in support of the European Constitution. An account of his efforts must, however, be more than a catalogue of texts. For his status as the last of the great system builders of European philosophy, comparable with Hegel in the breadth and explanatory power of his thought

in Habermas and European integration
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Modernity, welfare state and EUtopia

Introduction Modernity, welfare state and EUtopia “Flow and boundary” – a suggestive image for a new constellation of border crossings. —Habermas, 19981 From its conception to the referenda of 2005 where it met its end, German philosopher Jürgen Habermas wrote in support of the European Constitution. An account of his efforts must, however, be more than a catalogue of texts. For his status as the last of the great system builders of European philosophy, comparable with Hegel in the breadth and explanatory power of his thought, precludes a straightforward

in Habermas and European Integration (second edition)
Qāsim Amīn, empire, and saying ‘no’

the political structure.3 Instead, saying ‘no’ can be a weapon that calls its speaker’s will and power into being. It would represent 181 Hesitation, appropriation, and citation one form of colonised agency that resonates with idealised constructions of anti-​ colonial resistance. This is not the case with Amīn. He calls for ‘no’, but his writings do not contain a direct refusal of colonialism. Even when he is critical of European commentators and practices, he is far from a subversive, anti-​colonial intellectual who directly confronts the metropole. Amīn’s call

in Colonial exchanges
Open Access (free)
Competing claims to national identity

’ in nationalism studies is therefore reproduced in studies about Croatia. Attempts to understand Croatian national identity have tended to articulate both modernism and primordialism in their most polemic forms. Those who consider Croatian national identity from a modernist perspective reproduce that approach in its most instrumental form. For example, David Campbell suggested that we should treat issues of nationalism and national MUP_Bellamy_08_Ch7 171 9/3/03, 9:38 T   C   172 identity ‘as questions of history violently

in The formation of Croatian national identity
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The Holocaust as a yardstick

seen by Muslims in Europe as colonialist occupiers. It’s easier therefore for Muslim Europeans who have found it hard to integrate to identify with the Palestinians.17 As Ajami concludes, the encounter with the West, with modernism and with freedom of expression is very painful. What is perceived as the non-integration of Muslim migrants – the ‘dish cities’ of many TV satellite dishes tuned to Arabic or Muslim channels – is a result of this encounter. In painful, even cruel words Ajami focuses on some of the ruins and disasters of this encounter: There is an Arab

in Haunted presents
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the political system are to be reduced. ‘Inflation of rising expectations’ and ‘ungovernability’ are the slogans of a policy that aims at a greater detachment of administration from public will-formation . . . Third, cultural policy is assigned the task of operating on two fronts. On the one hand, it is to discredit intellectuals as the social bearers of modernism ... On the other hand, traditional culture and the stabilising forces of conventional morality, patriotism, bourgeois religion, and folk culture are

in Habermas and European integration