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Tim William Machan

of gratitude, an expression that still occurs in a common table prayer, into an affirmation of gendered social roles that well-suits Victorian sensibility: meals become the responsibility of women, who become ladies and not just females. Of greater consequence, Slingsby claims, ‘As I have stayed at all sorts of farm-houses and with many of the Norse gentry and merchants, I have got to know and I hope to appreciate fully the characteristics and sterling good qualities of a race to which I am proud to believe that we are nearer akin than to any other in Europe.’ 10

in Northern memories and the English Middle Ages
Tim William Machan

At the opening of his 1836 Adventures in the North of Europe , Edward Landor makes a perhaps surprising admission. ‘Quite aware that in the well-trampled field of literature I had no chance of making an impression as a sober, plodding traveller’, he says, ‘I imagined that by creating a more interesting wanderer … who should follow the path I myself had pursued, I might, perhaps, win over a few readers who would have taken no pleasure in a mere matter-of-fact, laborious narrative.’ 1 For Landor, his journey to Scandinavia and the experiences he had there were

in Northern memories and the English Middle Ages
A queer history
Peter Buchanan

historiography, layering multiple times and perspectives to demonstrate the fundamental instability and idiosyncrasy of interpretation. First, I will provide a brief account of Bryher's life – given her relative obscurity outside of historical studies of modernism – in which I will pay special attention to her relationship with H.D., the modernist poet and ‘since 1919 [Bryher's] companion, sometime lover, and always friend’, 4 and the French bookseller Adrienne Monnier, to whom the novel is dedicated. H.D. and Monnier represent

in Dating Beowulf
Tim William Machan

Indo-European language families, Hickes derives Old English, Old High German, and Old Norse (which he calls Cimbrica) from Gothic, and he even provides a tree diagram to illustrate these connections and the development of Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish from Cimbrica. ‘You can see therefore’, he advises his reader, ‘what a great affinity there is among many languages, and how with a little effort, with the aid of ancient writers, it is possible to learn or at least understand the excellent languages of northern Europe.’ In the fashion of the times, Hickes

in Northern memories and the English Middle Ages
Open Access (free)
Daniel C. Remein and Erica Weaver

-historical relationship to Beowulf that reveals a queerness at the heart of literary modernism, leveraged through a kitschy plaster bulldog named Beowulf in a novel of the same title by Bryher. Bryher's Beowulf does not, Buchanan argues, directly adapt or correspond to the Old English poem of the same name but rather performs a kind of ‘historical palimpsest’, returning us to an analysis of the women in the Old English Beowulf and the gendering of intimacy in the poem and its afterlives. A knot in the bed sheets of literary history and an important contribution to queer studies

in Dating Beowulf
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Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century views
Susan M. Johns

narrative structures, developments and content. For example, Carole Fabricant argues that the growth in travel literature was related to an increased interest in the figure of the traveller in popular literature, the spirit of scientific enquiry and the importance of the Grand Tour and travel within Britain (not least in the Lake District, Scotland as well as Wales, c. 1795 –1815, when opportunities abroad were limited by war) and was stimulated by the growth in European travel. 26 Elizabeth Bohls stresses the importance of imperial expansion and the ongoing

in Gender, nation and conquest in the high Middle Ages
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Mairi Cowan

about through a combination of lay-led initiatives and elite-driven repressions, and are best appreciated when Scotland is considered within the context of the broader and deeper early modern currents of change in Europe. To put it another way, the ‘reformatioun’ for which David Lyndsay longed is not something historians should seek within medieval developments or Protestant trends, but in the Catholic

in Death, life, and religious change in Scottish towns, c.1350–1560
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Performing the politics of passion: Troilus and Criseyde and Troilus and Cressida and the literary tradition of love and history
Andrew James Johnston and Russell West-Pavlov

injunction, ‘we cannot not periodize’. 14 Yet periods are notoriously fluid and their labels polysemic. ‘Long centuries’ in cultural and literary history make a mockery of the segmentation they repose upon. Terms such as the modern, modernity, modernism, and modernization have multiple overlapping and conflicting denotations exacerbated by their various disciplinary affiliations, for example literary high

in Love, history and emotion in Chaucer and Shakespeare
Timing The Birth of a Nation
Anke Bernau

he links to such media as print, then film represented a newly powerful medium through which a national collectivity could be reached to a previously undreamt-of extent. Alongside such self-consciously progressive constructions of nationhood, however, North America also followed the trajectory of European nationalisms which, from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century, looked to the

in Medieval film
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Anatomy of a metaphor
John M. Ganim

the period from the late 1930s to the early 1960s. 9 Marc Vernet questions whether film noir can be defined by intellectual influences – imported European lighting and film techniques, or the other factors normally associated with the rise of film noir . 10 He finds what we call noir in the American crime film from its earliest beginnings, and attributes the classic definition of Borde and

in Medieval film