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An epilogue
Saurabh Dube

imaginary but palpable distended and aggrandizing West/Europe as modernity – for all those awaiting its second coming in prior places, anachronistic spaces, lagging in time. In artistic, intellectual, and aesthetic arenas, modernism(s) in South Asia have variously, often critically, engaged with these projections and presuppositions: but they have also been unable to easily escape

in Subjects of modernity
Prisoners of the past
Author: Richard Jobson

This book examines the impact that nostalgia has had on the Labour Party’s political development since 1951. In contrast to existing studies that have emphasised the role played by modernity, it argues that nostalgia has defined Labour’s identity and determined the party’s trajectory over time. It outlines how Labour, at both an elite and a grassroots level, has been and remains heavily influenced by a nostalgic commitment to an era of heroic male industrial working-class struggle. This commitment has hindered policy discussion, determined the form that the modernisation process has taken and shaped internal conflict and cohesion. More broadly, Labour’s emotional attachment to the past has made it difficult for the party to adjust to the socioeconomic changes that have taken place in Britain. In short, nostalgia has frequently left the party out of touch with the modern world. In this way, this book offers an assessment of Labour’s failures to adapt to the changing nature and demands of post-war Britain.

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Modernity, welfare state and Eutopia
Shivdeep Grewal

‘Flow and boundary’ – a suggestive image for a new constellation of border crossings. (Habermas, 2001 ) 1 From its conception to the referenda of 2005 where it met its end, German philosopher Jürgen Habermas wrote in support of the European Constitution. An account of his efforts must, however, be more than a catalogue of texts. For his status as the last of the great system builders of European philosophy, comparable with Hegel in the breadth and explanatory power of his thought

in Habermas and European integration
Peter J. Verovšek

, ‘ Public Discourse and Cosmopolitan Political Identity: Imagining the European Union Citizen ,’ Futures , 38 ( 2006 ), 139 . By stifling imagination and the ability to fantasise [ Phantasie ], which is crucial to creating new structures that go beyond the nation-state, the EU is dooming its own project. 30 S. Benhabib , The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt ( Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield , 2003 ), xliv ; H. Arendt , ‘ Approaching the German Question ,’ in Jerome Kohn (ed), Essays in Understanding, 1930–1954 ( New York : Harcourt, Brace & Co

in Memory and the future of Europe
Open Access (free)
Antinomies and enticements
Saurabh Dube

that the developmental idea of a supersession of the past is crucial to modern imaginaries. This is true of academic assumption and everyday understanding, and also underlies the mutual articulations of modernity, modernization, and modernism. Such splitting of the past from the present is simultaneously temporal and spatial. Here the singular temporal trajectory and the exclusive spatial location of

in Subjects of modernity
Perspectives on civilisation in Latin America
Jeremy C.A. Smith

expressed in history, others would continue shortly after in the modernist arts, literature, poetry, music and philosophy. A second wave of radical modernism emerged in Marxist politics, political economy, liberation theology and indigenous movements. 153 Engagement in the cross-currents of history 153 Modernism arose at the turn of the twentieth century as a movement of artists, philosophers, writers, poets, musicians and activists (Schelling, 2000). In a short time, they remedied the positivist cultures that had denigrated Latin America and venerated European

in Debating civilisations
Peter J. Verovšek

, Essays in Understanding , 391; also Benhabib, The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt , 86–95. For more on the connection between Arendt and Habermas, see P. J. Verovšek , ‘ A Case of Communicative Learning: Rereading Habermas’s Philosophical Project through an Arendtian Lens ,’ Polity , 51 : 3 ( 2019 ), 597 –627 . 22 Frank, Constituent Moments , ch. 1. 23 Verovšek, ‘Unexpected Support for European Integration,’ 389–413. 24 H. Arendt , On Revolution ( New York : Penguin Classics , 1990 ), 204 . 25 S. Benhabib , ‘ Democratic Exclusions and

in Memory and the future of Europe
Anastasia Marinopoulou

 8 1 3 Modernism and postmodernism O gentlemen, the time of life is short! … If life did ride upon a dial’s point, Still ending at the arrival of an hour. And if we live, we live to tread on kings. William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 1 5.2.82–​7. So we should not expect Foucault to give us a philosophical theory that deploys … notions. Still, philosophy is more than theories. ‘Foucault and Epistemology’ by Richard Rorty in David Couzens Hoy (ed.), Foucault: A Critical Reader1 Introduction Foucault: the catcher in the modern rye When discussing modernity, one

in Critical theory and epistemology
Peter J. Verovšek

. Sznaider , ‘ Memory Unbound: The Holocaust and the Formation of Cosmopolitan Memory ,’ European Journal of Social Theory , 5 : 1 ( 2002 ); N. G. Finkelstein , The Holocaust Industry: Reflection on the Exploitation of Jewish Suffering ( New York : Verso , 2000 ). 41 S. Benhabib , The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt ( Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield , 2003 ), 92 . 42 J. Winter , Dreams of Peace and Freedom: Utopian Moments in the Twentieth Century ( New Haven : Yale University Press , 2006 ). 43 Winter, Sites of Memory, Sites of

in Memory and the future of Europe
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The Holocaust as a yardstick
Amikam Nachmani

seen by Muslims in Europe as colonialist occupiers. It’s easier therefore for Muslim Europeans who have found it hard to integrate to identify with the Palestinians.17 As Ajami concludes, the encounter with the West, with modernism and with freedom of expression is very painful. What is perceived as the non-integration of Muslim migrants – the ‘dish cities’ of many TV satellite dishes tuned to Arabic or Muslim channels – is a result of this encounter. In painful, even cruel words Ajami focuses on some of the ruins and disasters of this encounter: There is an Arab

in Haunted presents