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The French search mission for the corpses of deportees in Germany, 1946–58

6 Renationalizing bodies? The French search mission for the corpses of deportees in Germany, 1946–58 1 Jean-Marc Dreyfus Introduction Corpses are not a research subject that a historian would normally choose, and less still corpses en masse. Whether approaches to mass violence are of political, social or cultural history, the ­historical analysis of societies tends to focus on the living, and corpses are discussed only in terms of a social group’s structure in relation to death, the social definition of which can be addressed only through a detailed cultural

in Human remains and mass violence

irrational in modern social life (Bigsby 1972; Henning 1979; Bradley 1997). Such a sensibility would find expression not only in poetry, literature, painting and sculpture, but would find further inspiration in the vast, teeming spaces of the modern metropolis, whose chaotic flows, unpredictable sequences of events and opaque and shadowy interstices provided the ideal sensorium for the classical 26 Migrating borders and moving times 1.1 Ruins of border truck stop, Wyler, Germany 1.2 ‘Beach’ in front of Hagemann’s travel agency, Wyler, Germany flâneur (or flâneuse

in Migrating borders and moving times
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fandom, typically associated with football, but also supporting other sports including basketball, volleyball, ice hockey and handball. Ultras are highly organised, often with a coordinating committee headed by a capo (head) who leads the strategy of the group and, more importantly for matchdays, conducts the choreographies and chants in the curva. The term derives from the ultrá-royaliste loyal supporters of the monarchy in the French Restoration (Testa, 2009). Both ‘ultrà’ and ‘ultras’ have been adopted as terms for these hardcore fans (Cere, 2002). Early taxonomies

in Ultras

­ political interpretations of genocide. It so happens that up until now the literature on biopolitics and genocide has been mostly written by theoreticians who were far more interested in (and informed about) biopolitics than in genocide as their main object of enquiry. Rather than using bio­ politics as an analytical perspective or a toolkit for the study of mass violence and genocide, providing new insights and developing new research agendas, it was the historical occurrence of genocide, or a very particular representation of it, to be exact, that was invoked as laying

in Human remains and mass violence
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Al-‘imaara (the building) as topos

protagonists agonise, not only because they move between two disparate spaces, but because of the conflicting norms which each space represents. Mehrez goes on to say that, for the 22 Cairo collages generation of novelists that followed Mahfouz, the hara seems to vanish from literature, to be replaced by the modern and anonymous world of the apartment building. From Mahfouz’s hara, therefore, al-‘imaara becomes the symbol of the ‘ambiguous’ modernity,1 as the antithesis of the traditional segregated space of the secluded harem, which is thoroughly associated to the

in Cairo collages

architecture of Waiting as an organising logic 27 neoliberal austerity, and public reactions to it, we need to understand the broader temporal horizons that act as organising logics within which individuals perceive social reality. Waiting rooms of history Eastern Europe is one of those regions of the world that can be characterised with Chakrabarty’s words – always in the waiting room of history (2000). The post-socialist transformations have been studied and critiqued in detail in the sociological and anthropological literature, and I do not wish to rehash them here

in Politics of waiting

is no pride in attacking people who are not looking for a fight, families, children or women. Likewise, proceeding with a fight when a group significantly outnumbers their opponents is not considered honourable. However, different hooligan groups do not necessarily abide by these codes, as was the case in a confrontation between Russian hooligans and English fans during the Euro 2016 tournament in France. In these situations, as Collins (2008) identifies, the emotional energy of the dominant group can overpower and to ensure victory they then engage in ‘forward

in Ultras
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Borders, ticking clocks and timelessness among temporary labour migrants in Israel

between time and how migration plays out. We will call this stretch of time that individuals spend as 108 Migrating borders and moving times im/migrants migration time. Griffiths et al. (2013) do a masterful job of summarising the various understandings in the literature of migration time as the multiple, layered time experienced by migrants. We conceptualise migration time more simply as the chronological period that stretches between emigration and having no end (immigration) or emigration and a definite end (return migration or new emigration). Migration time

in Migrating borders and moving times
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Deaths at sea and unidentified bodies in Lesbos

militarisation and securitisation that accompanies those deaths (Albahari 2006). The literature has reached a consensus that borders are not value-free; rather, they reflect sovereign strategies of political inclusion and exclusion (Johnson and Jones 2011: 62). The most important innovation of the border is that it serves as a 160 Migrating borders and moving times tool of inclusion (for the in-group, largely citizens), but at the same time excludes the rest of humanity. As Paasi (2011: 62) argues: ‘bordering separates and brings together. Borders allow certain expressions

in Migrating borders and moving times
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; Millward, 2011; 2012; Caudwell, 2012; Cleland and Dixon, 2014; Millward and Poulton, 2014), Italy (Testa and Armstrong, 2010; Contucci and Francesio, 2013; Doidge, 2013; 2015a), Croatia (Hodges, 2014; 2018; Hodges and Brentin, 2018; Perasović and Mustapić, 2018), Turkey (Erhart, 2011; 2014; Nuhrat, 2013; 2018a; 2018b; McManus, 2014), Germany (Merkel, 2012; Brandt and Hertel, 2015), Poland (Antonowicz et al., 2016; Kossakowski et al., 2018), France (Lestrelin et al., 2006; 2013; Ginhoux, 2018), Brazil (Hollanda and Teixeira, 2017), Mexico (Magazine, 2007; Magazine and

in Ultras