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The life and times of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

penetrating, revealing, and at times, pathetic autobiography in the history of Western literature, namely Les Confessions. Having antagonised his former friends among the Encycloplédistes, the Genevan authorities, the Catholic Church, and just about everyone else, Rousseau did himself few favours by writing his Confessions – and his other autobiographical writings, Dialouges: Rousseau juge de Jean-Jacques (1776), Les rêveries du promeneur solitaire (1778), and his letters to the French censor Malesherbes in 1762. As Byron noted about Rousseau, in Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

7 Music, language and literature Language and music The divergent interpretations of the relationship between music and language in modernity are inseparable from the main divergences between philosophical conceptions of language. The attempt to explain language in representational terms in the empiricist tradition that eventually leads to analytical philosophy, and the understanding of language as a form of social action and as constitutive of the world we inhabit in the hermeneutic tradition give rise to very different conceptions of music. One paradigmatic

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
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the book is a philosophy’.108 This book Previous books which broach drinking in literature have tended to approach the subject by making the connection between the author’s drinking and the writing a central feature. Donald W. Goodwin’s Alcohol and the Writer (1988) is mainly devoted to drinking sketches of American writers –​Poe, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Faulkner, and O’Neill –​ to which he adds in the French Georges Simenon, ‘Learning to Drink American-​Style’, and the English-​born, Canada-​resident Lowry.109 The book ‘proposes … that alcoholism among

in The Existential drinker

must link individual inclusion claims to collective self-government claims in order to avoid a status quo bias” (p. 30). But to do that we need some prior way of identifying Algeria and Ireland (rather than Algeria-in-France and Ireland-in-Britain) as the proper units of self-government, and ASC, as a principle of individual inclusion, is of no help here. So what does Bauböck suggest instead? He proposes the all citizen

in Democratic inclusion
Case studies from the Victorian period

letter numbers in this chapter refer to the numbering on that site. 27 Compare this to genre painting depictions of inns, which are usually happy affairs, as in seventeenth-​ century ‘Merry Company’ paintings, by, for example, Willem Pietersz, Dirck Hals, Abraham van den Hecken. 28 Judy Sund observes that van Gogh’s painting of his house in Arles, and the letter to Theo describing the places in the picture, ‘indicate that the picture served as a form of autobiography’. Judy Sund, True to Temperament: Van Gogh and French Naturalist Literature (Cambridge

in The Existential drinker
Rousseau’s and nationalism

: Corsica in 1764 and Poland in 1770. In 1764 he was invited by Mathieu Buttafuoco (a former French soldier and Corsican nobleman) to draw up a constitution for Corsica. This request came against the backdrop of considerable tensions and civil war on the island. In 1735 the Corsicans had revolted against their masters, Genoa. Although Genoese rule was restored in 1748, the revolt resumed in 1752 under the popular leader Pasquale Paoli (for whom Buttafuoco worked) and was temporarily successful. The prospect of independence – and Rousseau’s testified support for the

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Frontier patterns old and new

territory and the next? This is a long unsettled question that raises its head periodically in one location or another throughout the region. In the early colonial period the islands were traded like booty, to the extent that St Lucia, traded back and forth between France and Great Britain, became known as the Helen of the West Indies. More prosaically, even within the British area of rule, boundaries

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
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What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?

.’ My postgraduate training had equipped me to note even the most ‘trivial’ invocations of ‘Europe’ and ‘the Balkans’, ‘Westernness’ and ‘Easternness’, modernity and backwardness, as everyday rearticulations of nationhood; yet south-east European studies' theoretical literature seemed to have posed no questions to which ‘DJ is so black’ might be the answer. Indeed, a white liberal reflex of ‘You can't say that!’, confusion over how I would bridge my home discipline's literature with work that explained it, plus fear that I was inappropriately projecting British

in Race and the Yugoslav region

3 Transnational formations of race before and during Yugoslav state socialism In domains from the history of popular entertainment to that of ethnicity and migration, ideas of race, as well as ethnicity and religion, have demonstrably formed part of how people from the Yugoslav region have understood their place in Europe and the world. The region's history during, and after, the era of direct European colonialism differed from the USA's, France's or Brazil's; but this did not exclude it from the networks of ‘race in translation’ (Stam and

in Race and the Yugoslav region
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For the love of God

humanity of women must be presumed not to reflect the divine or an authentic relation to the divine, or to reflect the authentic nature of things, or to be the message or work of an authentic redeemer or a community of redemption. (1983: 19) Notwithstanding the problems of ontology betrayed by the invocation of the notion of authenticity, Ruether’s concern with the denial of full humanity for women connects the projects of feminist theologies with the broader concerns of feminism.58 Indeed, her concerns echo the recent writing of the French feminist philosopher and

in The subject of love