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the initial decisions. I relied on the EISF (European Interagency Security Forum) network to set up the crisis-management trainings for all the heads of mission. We held several crisis-management trainings in the Sahel, Turkey, Thailand and Kenya. Most MdM heads of mission completed the training between 2013 and 2015. Task Four: Simplifying the Security Tools The EISF network and the humanitarian security literature it curates also helped guide my

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local

building upon existing literature on humanitarian campaigns and critiques of neoliberal approaches to refugee situations. With regards to the latter, it is important to start by acknowledging that humanitarian agencies around the world are facing cumulative funding reductions and a concomitant drive to diversify their donors. Simultaneously, donors and agencies alike are promoting greater degrees of ‘localisation’ – supporting the roles played by regional, national and local actors in affected regions – and ‘self-reliance’ amongst refugee

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Current policy options and issues

challenges which make the enforcement of sanctions difficult. These challenges are largely a result of lack of political will and capacity by key actors. Sanctions require a great deal of international cooperation and agreement which for political (and economic) reasons is often lacking. In regard to addressing the regional war economy in West Africa, for example, both France and China blocked attempts to place sanctions on the trade of Liberian timber (Atkinson, 2008). Sanctions can also have a perverse effect on the goal of transformation by increasing the incentives for

in Building a peace economy?
Abstract only

women as users of state and voluntary sector services in France and Britain, but also on their involvement in political and civic action and activism and as agents of change. Therefore, it does three things. First, it contributes to the literature on the reception and settlement of refugee women in destination societies in the West. It examines asylum-seeking and refugee women’s interactions within and with processes and structures related to asylum and immigration (including detention) and those to do with housing, health, education and training and employment

in Refugee women in Britain and France
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the domestic level, what are (if any) the implications of this study for another key aspect of the literature on ‘Europeanisation’, namely institutional convergence (Knill 2001)? The aforementioned analysis of the similarities of the cases of Greece and France (where the problems that were expected and were subsequently identified have also been, to a large extent, resolved) may give the impression of a gradual institutional convergence stemming from the exigencies of the implementation of the directives examined here. Such an impression would be misleading for

in The power of the centre
Open Access (free)
La gauche de la gauche

6 Beyond the mainstream: la gauche de la gauche Jim Wolfreys The left Beyond the mainstream: la gauche de la gauche Introduction In the summer of 1998 an article in Le Monde entitled ‘Quand la France s’amuse’ compared the apparently beatific state of mind of the French in the wake of the national team’s World Cup victory with that evoked by Pierre Viansson-Ponté in his celebrated essay ‘Quand la France s’ennuie . . . ’ written on the eve of the May ‘68 events.1 As with the original article, such complacency proved at odds with a powerful undercurrent in

in The French party system
Power, accountability and democracy

Does European integration contribute to, or even accelerate, the erosion of intra-party democracy? This book is about improving our understanding of political parties as democratic organisations in the context of multi-level governance. It analyses the impact of European Union (EU) membership on power dynamics, focusing on the British Labour Party, the French Socialist Party (PS), and the German Social Democratic Party (SPD). The purpose of this book is to investigate who within the three parties determines EU policies and selects EU specialists, such as the candidates for European parliamentary elections and EU spokespersons.

The book utilises a principal-agent framework to investigate the delegation of power inside the three parties across multiple levels and faces. It draws on over 65 original interviews with EU experts from the three national parties and the Party of European Socialists (PES) and an e-mail questionnaire. This book reveals that European policy has largely remained in the hands of the party leadership. Its findings suggest that the party grassroots are interested in EU affairs, but that interest rarely translates into influence, as information asymmetry between the grassroots and the party leadership makes it very difficult for local activists to scrutinise elected politicians and to come up with their own policy proposals. As regards the selection of EU specialists, such as candidates for the European parliamentary elections, this book highlights that the parties’ processes are highly political, often informal, and in some cases, undemocratic.

Social and cultural modernity beyond the nation-state

German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has written extensively on the European Union. This is the only in-depth account of his project. Published now in a second edition to coincide with the celebration of his ninetieth birthday, a new preface considers Habermas’s writings on the eurozone and refugee crises, populism and Brexit, and the presidency of Emmanuel Macron.

Placing an emphasis on the conception of the EU that informs Habermas’s political prescriptions, the book is divided into two main parts. The first considers the unfolding of 'social modernity' at the level of the EU. Among the subjects covered are Habermas's concept of juridification, the latter's affinities with integration theories such as neofunctionalism, and the application of Habermas's democratic theory to the EU. The second part addresses 'cultural modernity' in Europe – 'Europessimism' is argued to be a subset of the broader cultural pessimism that assailed the project of modernity in the late twentieth century, and with renewed intensity in the years since 9/11.

Interdisciplinary in approach, this book engages with European/EU studies, critical theory, political theory, international relations, intellectual history, comparative literature, and philosophy. Concise and clearly written, it will be of interest to students, scholars and professionals with an interest in these disciplines, as well as to a broader readership concerned with the future of Europe

Community engagement and lifelong learning

In this broad sweep, Mayo explores dominant European discourses of higher education, in the contexts of different globalisations and neoliberalism, and examines its extension to a specific region. It explores alternatives in thinking and practice including those at the grassroots, also providing a situationally grounded project of university–community engagement. Signposts for further directions for higher education lifelong learning, with a social justice purpose, are provided.

Place, space and discourse
Editors: Christine Agius and Dean Keep

Identity is often regarded as something that is possessed by individuals, states, and other agents. In this edited collection, identity is explored across a range of approaches and under-explored case studies with a view to making visible its fractured, contingent, and dynamic features. The book brings together themes of belonging and exclusion, identity formation and fragmentation. It also examines how identity functions in discourse, and the effects it produces, both materially and in ideational terms. Taking in case studies from Asia-Pacific, Europe, the Middle East and Latin America, the various chapters interrogate identity through formal governing mechanisms, popular culture and place. These studies demonstrate the complex and fluid nature of identity and identity practices, as well as implications for theorising identity.