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Insurgents’ use of terrorism at the initial stages of conflict
Susanne Martin and Leonard Weinberg

commando team skyjacked an Air France jet bound for Tel Aviv and diverted it to the Ugandan airport outside Kampala, the state’s capital. The incident is remembered today because it ended when Israeli special operations forces stormed the airport lounge, killed the terrorists and liberated the hostages. The major German groups enjoyed somewhat greater success on the domestic front. For more than a decade, the RAF and the June 2 Movement kidnapped and often killed prominent public officials, bankers and businesspeople. The end of the Cold War and the collapse of the

in The role of terrorism in twenty-first-century warfare
Data and measurement
Susanne Martin and Leonard Weinberg

conjunction with other means of mass mobilization. Terrorism was simply one tool among many. The benefits of terrorist violence were also recognized by groups on the far-right as well as those drawn to the cause of national independence. Accordingly, during the interwar period, fascist bands in France (e.g., Street Followers of the King), Romania (e.g., Iron Guard), and Hungary (e.g., Arrow Cross), as well as those in Italy and Germany, carried out assassinations of prominent anti-fascist politicians and journalists. In Yugoslavia, the Ustasha combined rabid Croat

in The role of terrorism in twenty-first-century warfare
Susanne Martin and Leonard Weinberg

terrorist tactics in the process. A secondary objective involves bridging the largely separate literatures on terrorism and warfare. These are the literatures on which this study draws and to which it contributes. Although scholarship on terrorism has developed largely THE “NEW” TERRORISM IN WARFARE 11 independently of scholarship on warfare, this separation makes little sense when referring to wars in the twenty-first century. Moreover, this separation makes little sense for a large number of wars (or “conflicts”), which took place during the twentieth century. As

in The role of terrorism in twenty-first-century warfare
Juvenile actors and humanitarian sentiment in the 1940s
Michael Lawrence

or hallucinate) a group of suffering foreign children, and then directly addresses the camera, challenging the audience to (in Butler’s terms) ‘apprehend a life or set of lives as precarious’. 28 In The Pied Piper , hereafter Piper , an elderly gentleman (Monty Wooley) holidaying in France in the summer of 1940 reluctantly agrees to chaperone two British children (Roddy McDowall and Peggy Ann Garner

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
The case of the Group for Social Dialogue
Anca Mihaela Pusca

6 The illusions and disillusions of civil society: the case of the Group for Social Dialogue Based on a series of interviews with the founding members of the Group for Social Dialogue—the first civil society organization in post-revolutionary Romania—clippings from the group’s magazine entitled 22—one of the most popular political magazines in the months immediately following the revolution—as well as a rich secondary literature on the larger concept of civil society, as viewed and interpreted by a number of leading Central and Eastern European writers and

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
The case of the Timisoara revolutionaries
Anca Mihaela Pusca

Revolution, particularly with regards to the violence and deaths that ocurred. Was the Romanian Revolution largely unexpected? There were several incidents that made it obvious that Romania, like the rest of Eastern Europe, was on the verge of a big change before 1989. While most examinations in the Eastern European literature argue that the Romanian revolution was perhaps the most unexpected of them all—both in its timing as well as in its ability to completely destroy the Ceausescu regime—a closer examination of a series of incidents—such as the Valea Jiului revolt in

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
Toby Fricker

2013, the 120,000 Syrians were living within a melting pot of aid workers, journalists, visiting politicians and celebrities. 9 Through extensive experience of working with media in Za’atari, news reports from international English-language media and academic literature, this chapter looks at the portrayal of children in media coverage of the camp. By analysing how reporting on children’s issues

in Global humanitarianism and media culture