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Persia, masculinity, and conversion in early seventeenth-century travel writing and drama

culture. The study of conversion between Christianity and Islam has occupied scholars interested in how religious identity was constructed in post-Reformation Europe, as well as those looking in particular at the relationship between the two religions. 2 The function of gender identity in relation to conversion has often been involved in these discussions

in Conversions
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religious conversions did take place, but when they were narrated at all they were conspicuously presented as a personal, inward matter of little wider import. Such actions were also largely the preserve of men. One prominent example is that of Harry St. John Bridger Philby (later Sheikh Abdullah), English agent in the Arabian Peninsula, and his 1930 conversion to the Wahhabi Islam of the new Saudi state he later came to

in Conversions
Gender and conversion in the early modern Mediterranean

In 1592, Francesco Mosca, an inhabitant of the Venetian town of Sebenico (modern-day Šibenik, Croatia) on the north-eastern Adriatic coast, converted to Islam, or in the parlance of the day, ‘turned Turk’. He had long had a disreputable reputation throughout the region: this was certainly due, in no small part, to his ‘profession’ of ‘killing

in Conversions
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Erotic commodification, cross-cultural conversion, and the bed-trick on the English stage, 1580–1630

political gain. 2 When a Christian converted to Islam, this was nearly always described as a betrayal motivated by avarice, lust, or a combination of both. An English captivity narrative from 1622, The famous and wonderful recovery of a ship of Bristol , claimed that many Christian captives in North Africa converted to Islam because they were tortured or threatened with violence, but

in Conversions
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work on conversion has emphasised its pragmatic and often prosaic nature, with converts changing faith rather for social, financial, or familial reasons than because of divine inspiration. Natalie Rothman, for example, narrates the case of Abdone, son of Giovanni of Aleppo, who changed faith on multiple occasions: ‘When being Christian was inconvenient, he practiced Islam: when it became convenient

in Conversions
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The Spanish Tragedy IV.iv in performance

Istanbul to condone the terror in New York?’ The answer, he argued, ‘is not Islam or what is idiotically described as the clash between East and West or poverty itself. It is the feeling of impotence deriving from degradation, the failure to be understood, and the inability of such people to make their voices heard.’ 33 In Snow , published a few months later, viewers are again watching television when

in Doing Kyd

retribution: Kyd, Shakespeare, Webster and the revenge tragedy genre ’, PhD dissertation, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey – New Brunswick , 2007 . Degenhardt , J. H. , ‘ Faith, embodiment, and “turning Turk”: Islamic conversion on the early modern stage and the production of religious and racial identity ’, PhD dissertation, University of Pennsylvania , 2005 . Deutermann , A. K. , ‘ Hearing and listening in early

in Doing Kyd

Cyprus in 1571, the loss of the island to Islam had a chilling effect on one important aspect of the religious life of Europe. Cyprus was Christianity’s Ultima Thule, the farthest outpost of the Faith in a vast Muslim-dominated region. Throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance an enormous number of Europeans – certainly many hundreds of thousands – undertook religious pilgrimages. Although

in Shakespeare for the wiser sort
Tales of origins in medieval and early modern France and England

), II, 36 (p. 432). 30 Aeneas Sylvius (Pope Pius II) limits this ascendancy to the Romans in his Cosmographia, in Opera omnia (Basel: Henricus Petri, 1551), esp. ‘De Asia’, lxvii, p. 349, and ‘De Europa’, xxxviii, p. 433. See Margaret Meserve, Empires of Islam in Renaissance Historical Thought

in Interweaving myths in Shakespeare and his contemporaries
Medea and the poetics of fratricide in early modern English literature

Ibid ., p. 36. 39 The play is traditionally dated to c . 1647, but Matthew Birchwood, Staging Islam in England: Drama and Culture 1640–85 (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2007), argues that though preparation on the work could have begun long before, the printed version of Mirza should be dated to 1655

in Interweaving myths in Shakespeare and his contemporaries