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Digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas

5 ‘Space-crossed time’: digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas1 Rachel Wells The places we have known do not belong only to the world of space on which we map them for our own convenience. They were only a thin slice, held between the contiguous impressions that composed our life at that time; the memory of a particular image is but regret for a particular moment; and houses, roads, avenues are as ­fugitive, alas, as the years. (Proust, 2002: 513) The creation of an ‘Atlas’ is an ambitious project. The word suggests accuracy in detail

in Time for mapping
Art and the temporalities of geomedia

into the dynamic archive of photographic mapping that is Google Street View.1 Over the course of their lives, most of these automated images – instances of what Joanna Zylinska calls ‘non-human photography’ – will escape serious human scrutiny (Zylinska, 2013). Until April 2014, these lives would have been cut short by updates from the restless fleet of Google’s Street View cars. Since the introduction of a time slider to Street View’s interface, however, such images remain accessible; although with all the millions of miles of road covered, and given the evident

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Mapping times

through their cartographic interfaces. It is through these embedded and interactive affordances that digital mapping transforms our notions of immediacy and futurity; allowing us to track our current and past locations as well as calling the future into being by advising on potential routes and ways forward. Introducing the future? The 21 October 2015 was Back to the Future Day – the destination date referenced in Robert Zemeckis’ iconic 1980s films, punched into the DeLorean time machine as the characters travel ‘back to the future’. The twenty-six year gap between

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Heterogeneous temporalities, algorithmic frames and subjective time in geomedia

of mechanical reproduction of cultural artefacts that leads to a detachment from tradition and authorship. He uses the example of film to explain how the new medium introduced a new temporal structure leading to a shift in perception from concentration to ‘[r]eception in the state of distraction’ (Benjamin, 1969: 240), well in line with the increased pace of mechanical industrial work and the modern city.2 Half a century later, Friedrich Kittler makes the notion of new media forming novel structures of space-time into an essential part of his media theory. In his

in Time for mapping