Search results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • Photography and Film x
  • Manchester International Relations x
Clear All

one problem: the video wasn’t real. It was the creation of 34-year-old director Lars Klevberg, and it was filmed in Malta with child actors, using a set from the movie Gladiator . Klevberg said he wanted the video to start a conversation about the impact of war on children. Critics said he had gone too far: that the video created confusion and cynicism, which undermined attempts to address conflict in Syria ( Salyer, 2014 ). ‘Syrian hero boy’ was not an isolated incident. When audiences look online for information about humanitarian crises, they

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From campaign imagery to contemporary art
Julia Gallagher and V. Y. Mudimbe

examine the successes and challenges faced by local initiatives such as the Addis Foto Fest and the work of practicing visual artists. In four parts, this chapter explores the creation of images of Ethiopia from the collection of African artefacts and the images of Live Aid, to modern productions of photography and art. Collecting cultures: from ‘primitive’ artefacts to starving children From visual abstraction to sculpture to architecture, African art influenced the course of twentieth century art in Europe. Artists including

in Images of Africa
Abstract only

sites of Cambodia, Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh Trail, Sarajevo, Srebrenica, Kosovo, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Angola – are all destinations of increasing interest to adventure tourists. The catastrophe is purchased with the strange currency of the media image – television, photography, filmand this image is almost always one of disaster. After disaster, reconstruction and the simulation of reconstitution draws the tourist faithful in pursuit of the authentic. After colonization, enslavement, genocide, and the annihilation of African lifeways in favour of the politically

in The ethics of researching war
Screening war in Kosovo and Chechnya

visual images, pictures, photographs and symbols on studies of insurgencies – particularly insofar as insurgents seek to use and control the ‘picture economy’. Meanwhile, the picture economy might include the filming of brutal and savage attacks, creating a kind of war-pornography – souvenirs as part of ‘trophy collecting in war’ – but which can be circulated through an informal market economy.49 Many of these ‘snuff videos’ serve typical local and personal 78 Globalisation and conflict: screening war combat narratives – victory against the odds, emphasising the

in Contemporary violence
Abstract only
A relational approach
Julia Gallagher and V. Y. Mudimbe

countries, ‘traditional authorities’ and parties, NGOs and militia groups, and images created in art, literature and film. The chapters broadly address a number of themes. First, a challenge to the idea that Africans are powerless in the creation of self-image. The authors explore different ways in which image creation is a process of negotiation entered into by a wide range of actors within and beyond the continent. Images of Africa thus reflect ideas and preoccupations from both the inside and the outside. Second, the contributors explore the

in Images of Africa
Abstract only

struggle over representation that plays out in the space between them. The priest is immobilized in the film, his intentions are lost, his name is denied, the sound of his voice and the content of his conversation destroyed. Photography is a hostage-taker. Devoid of any core meaning outside of the unknown intentions of the photographer, the politics of imaging seeks to naturalize particular interpretations of meaning, and the photograph becomes a tool in the service of other goals.4 Politics may be read into and mapped onto the skin of the film with very real

in The ethics of researching war
A visual narrative of the Romanian transition to capitalism

spoken narratives. The group is unique in its approach to photography as well as in its composition, bringing together members with a very diverse set of skills and sensibilities, many of them having been trained in the field of humanities as opposed to photog- 183 184 REVOLUTION, DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION AND DISILLUSIONMENT raphy. Among the group members, Voicu Bojan graduated from the Faculty of Letters; Cosmin Bumbut from the Academy of Theater and Film; Petrut Calinescu studied journalism and mass media and now works as a photojournalist; Bogdan Croitoru, Vasile

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment

shock, allowing contemporary treatments of the concept to focus on shock as not only desirable but also essential to how the modern self is defined. Shock thus became directly connected to the thrill and speed of modern experience, to pleasure sought in reaching new extremes and surviving the impossible. It also became connected to the increasing stimulation of the senses particularly through different kinds of 57 58 REVOLUTION, DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION AND DISILLUSIONMENT illusory experiences made possible by the manipulation of the visual through photography, film

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment