Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 50 items for :

  • Photography and Film x
  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
Clear All

development of photography and film had important effects on the staging and impact of royal and princely voyages. Organisers initially had some difficulties in managing these ‘new’ media. Some photos were taken during Crown Prince Albert’s 1909 exploratory voyage, but they were not really destined for public circulation. 12 Media coverage (through long newspaper articles) was mainly limited to the prince’s homecoming, which was celebrated with

in Royals on tour
Abstract only
Mass photography, monarchy and the making of colonial subjects

. 7 Families who wanted photographs of themselves in the nineteenth century had to hire professionals for the task, the expense of which excluded all but the well-to-do. Around 1900, with the invention of the portable box camera and roll film, photography became technically accessible to amateurs with more modest means. By the 1920s people on relatively modest incomes in the Indies could afford cameras and assemble albums of their own photographs, as attested to by the thousands of personal albums in archival collections today

in Photographic subjects
The Dutch colonial world during Queen Wilhelmina’s reign, 1898–1948

But it was the advent of mass photography, which coincided roughly with the beginning of Wilhelmina's reign, that enabled a wide variety of people throughout the Dutch empire to participate in and commemorate royal celebrations in ways that neither radio nor film permitted. Not until Queen Emma's regency in the 1890s were photographs of royal occasions widely published; before then, they were rare. 49 At the turn of the century, when Wilhelmina's reign commenced, it was mainly studio photographers who had the

in Photographic subjects
Abstract only
Photographic encounters between Dutch and Indonesian royals

. In this chapter I argue that, just as the proliferation of photography in the Netherlands Indies filled the void of Wilhelmina's absence with a visual and material culture rich in social and political functions, so photography enabled Central Javanese royals to pursue more complex relations with the Dutch monarchy than has previously been recognised. Indeed, the fact that Mangkunegoro VII (r. 1916–44), who was otherwise an avid sponsor of photography at his court, was the only Central Javanese royal both to meet the queen and not to send her an album as a gift

in Photographic subjects

Governor-General A. C. D. de Graeff (served 1926–31) released 219 internees from Tanah Merah. 15 Neither he nor Wilhelmina and Juliana could have guessed that New Guinea would be all that was left of the Netherlands East Indies two decades later. The end of Dutch rule began in March 1942, when Japan invaded the East Indies as part of its war in the Pacific. During the occupation, internment camps were established for European civilians and prisoners of war. Photography was not allowed in the camps, and

in Photographic subjects
Abstract only
Lights, camera and … ‘Ethical’ rule!

reactionary shift to the right among colonial authorities – that a visual association between modernity, enlightened colonial rule and the House of Orange began to appear in amateur as well as official photography in the Indies. Through their frequent depiction of electric illuminations at royal celebrations, photographers left the failing political spirit of the Ethical Policy out of the frame to focus instead on its more tangible successes: modern conveniences such as electricity, among other infrastructural improvements. In doing so, well-off family photographers and

in Photographic subjects

often leave little archival trace, so Chislett's records, held at the Yorkshire Film Archive and Rotherham Archives, offer a rare opportunity to consider the impact of increased mobility on an individual tourist and his local community. 59 Before the Second World War, Chislett had travelled domestically and within Europe, but in the 1960s his travel horizons expanded dramatically: in 1962 he embarked on a thousand-mile cruise up the Nile, following this a year later with a Middle Eastern air cruise that stopped in Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan. In early 1965 he took a

in British civic society at the end of empire
Linley Sambourne, Punch, and imperial allegory

armour and closely juxtaposed with a nubile and appealing Cleopatra, he can only appear an incongruously mismatched suitor, and the two seem reminiscent less of Shakespeare's ‘mutual pair’ than of Sid James's leering Antony and Amanda Barrie's gormless Queen of the Nile in the 1964 film Carry on Cleo . Because, that is, of the disparate modes from which the cartoon has been assembled (topical caricature, parodic literary allusion, classicised personification, national stereotype), its status as political commentary has been rendered ambivalent: what was presumably

in Comic empires

pamphlets, films and public speakers, seeking to capitalise on the expanding educational remits of organisations like the WI and Rotary Club. Local FFHC committees across the country were encouraged to form study groups and a monthly Ideas and Action bulletin kept readers abreast of conferences, published reports, and the progress that was being made on specific projects. More detailed information was also provided by the Basic Studies series, designed for use by NGOs cooperating in the campaign. 90 These studies aimed to use ‘brief but authoritative language’ to

in British civic society at the end of empire

magic mirrors of television and photographyand the ‘magic carpet of modern transport’ put the English parish in touch with the ‘needs of all God's children’. Although this juxtaposition emphasises the pervasive sense of connectedness that characterised humanitarian activity in the 1960s, it also obscures the way in which missionary activity had already breached the isolation of the parish, connecting its members to the outside world since the eighteenth century. The financial support and manpower demanded by the missionary project had always required missionaries to

in British civic society at the end of empire