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Making work pay

intensification in the UK, Geddes and Scott (2010) suggest that the availability of a migrant workforce has acted as a de facto industry subsidy to keep food prices low and to avoid excessive reliance on imports. While the benefits to consumers are obvious, this has negative implications for workers. In an analysis of African immigrant employment in Spanish agriculture, Hoggart and Mendoza (1999) emphasise the uncertainty of farm work due to the lack of permanent contracts accompanied by low wages and poor working conditions. A brief profile of the horticultural labour force

in Spacing Ireland
Young people in migrant worker families in Ireland

in Ireland has received attention in political circles and in the popular press due to a number of ‘moral panics’ concerning children’s education and socialisation (Ní Laoire et al., 2009) and, more recently, the economic recession. In times of economic uncertainty, immigration often is perceived as a threat and of concern to society. Recent research by Spencer, Ruhs, Anderson and Rogaly (2007) in a UK context suggests that migrant workers who migrate with children are more likely to intend to remain living in their host country, specifically because they are more

in Spacing Ireland

community gardens provided a personal salvation that was achieved by means of collaboration with others and for the benefit of many others more (Eizenberg, 2012a; Schmelzkopf, 1995). Since then, the idea has crossed oceans. The impressive bundle of benefits to human physical and psychological health, as well as to urban community life, might explain the surge of different forms of communal urban gardening during the last few decades on all five continents, including Asia and Africa. In some parts of the world, an old tradition was revived in the contemporary context and

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Concepts and practice

chapter will provide a reading of political gardening literature, outlining rationales for ‘public’ engagement with UG.This informs a framework that maps the trajectories groups take in pursuit of spatial justice. We illustrated with UK case studies. The conclusion speculates a definition for political UG that reflects the process by which gardens ‘turn’ political.  The ­implication of this political ‘turn’ through process is the creation of active ‘democratised’ citizens who recognise injustice and hold a heightened awareness of rights. Neoliberal processes and

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice

6 Lone parents, leisure mobilities and the everyday Bernadette Quinn Recent social and economic commentary on Ireland has tended to accentuate the extreme changes associated with the Celtic Tiger era. Stories of ostentatious consumption patterns dominated discursive narratives in popular, academic and policy forums. This was for good reason as trend data of all descriptions attested to startling transformations in people’s lifestyles and mobilities. To take just one example, data from the Census Statistics Office (CSO) (2007; 2008) show that foreign overnight

in Spacing Ireland