Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 50 items for :

  • UK Africa policy x
  • Manchester History of Medicine x
Clear All
Space, identity and power

This volume aims to disclose the political, social and cultural factors that influenced the sanitary measures against epidemics developed in the Mediterranean during the long nineteenth century. The contributions to the book provide new interdisciplinary insights to the booming field of ‘quarantine studies’ through a systematic use of the analytic categories of space, identity and power. The ultimate goal is to show the multidimensional nature of quarantine, the intimate links that sanitary administrations and institutions had with the territorial organization of states, international trade, the construction of national, colonial, religious and professional identities or the configuration of political regimes. The circum-Mediterranean geographical spread of the case studies contained in this volume illuminates the similarities and differences around and across this sea, on the southern and northern shores, in Arabic, Spanish, Portuguese, Greek, Italian, English and French-speaking domains. At the same time, it is highly interested in engaging in the global English-speaking community, offering a wide range of terms, sources, bibliography, interpretative tools and views produced and elaborated in various Mediterranean countries. The historical approach will be useful to recognize the secular tensions that still lie behind present-day issues such as the return of epidemics or the global flows of migrants and refugees.

Bodies and environments in Italy and England

This book explores whether early modern people cared about their health, and what did it mean to lead a healthy life in Italy and England. According to the Galenic-Hippocratic tradition, 'preservative' medicine was one of the three central pillars of the physician's art. Through a range of textual evidence, images and material artefacts, the book documents the profound impact which ideas about healthy living had on daily practices as well as on intellectual life and the material world in Italy and England. Staying healthy and health conservation was understood as depending on the careful management of the six 'Non-Naturals': the air one breathed, food and drink, excretions, sleep, exercise and repose, and the 'passions of the soul'. The book provides fresh evidence about the centrality of the Non-Naturals in relation to groups whose health has not yet been investigated in works about prevention: babies, women and convalescents. Pregnancy constituted a frequent physical state for many women of the early modern European aristocracy. The emphasis on motion and rest, cleansing the body, and improving the mental and spiritual states made a difference for the aristocratic woman's success in the trade of frequent pregnancy and childbirth. Preventive advice was not undifferentiated, nor simply articulated by individual complexion. Examining the roles of the Non-Naturals, the book provides a more holistic view of convalescent care. It also deals with the paradoxical nature of perceptions about the Neapolitan environment and the way in which its airs were seen to affect human bodies and health.

Abstract only
Krista Maglen

European EU, forty-seven per cent from Central America, thirty-six per cent from North Africa and twenty-six per cent from the ‘Middle East’ – has also not been reflected in disease preparedness at these airports where port health precautions have been downplayed, uncoordinated and even ineffective.17 The Loughborough researchers argue that the enormous increase in air-passenger traffic to regional airports has forced a shift in the UK border that has ‘effectively re-sited or “localise[d]” the border both across and within UK territory’.18 They contend that because the

in The English System
Abstract only
Historicising a ‘revolution’
Julian M. Simpson

-​sufficiency may be a legitimate political goal, but depending on migration while at the same time stigmatising migrants (the dominant narrative of British policy in this respect) is, as Christopher Kyriakides and Satnam Virdee have argued, somewhat paradoxical.7 More generally, this history shows that medical training in the UK has never been adequately aligned to the needs of the NHS. UK medical schools have not succeeded in bringing about a training system that over the long term has ensured that new cohorts of doctors contain sufficient numbers of graduates willing to fill

in Migrant architects of the NHS
Julian M. Simpson

Harbans Lall Gulati, a GP in Battersea for forty years until his death in 1967.41 Another Battersea doctor, Abdul Majid Shah committed suicide by gassing himself in 1935.42 The actor Sir Ben Kingsley is the son of Rahimtulla Bhanji, a South Asian doctor from East Africa who became a GP in Northern England before World War II.43 Dhani Prem, who became a councillor in Birmingham and was a prominent advocate of migrant and minority rights migrated to the UK in the 1930s.44 In 1925, Sureswar Sarkar, an Indian doctor living in Sheffield, was sentenced to five years of penal

in Migrant architects of the NHS
The working lives of paid carers from 1800 to the 1990s
Anne Borsay and Pamela Dale

Disability in Victorian England: The Earlswood Asylum 1847–1901 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001), pp. 99–119. 34 S. Marks, ‘The microphysics of power: mental nursing in South Africa in  the  first half of the twentieth century’, in S. Mahone and M. Vaughan (eds), Psychiatry and Empire (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), pp. 67–98. 35 Local history groups are making personal photographs, biographical notes and other memorabilia available on websites alongside more traditional archival material. 36 See also J. Campbell, ‘Mental health policy, care in the community and

in Mental health nursing
Doctors’ organisations and activist medics
Julian M. Simpson

Medical Society when it was set up by Shadow Minister for Health Gerard Vaughan and became its secretary.53 Ray and Chandran were not the only South Asian doctors playing a leading role in debating issues affecting migrants and ethnic minority groups and influencing policy. M. Hamid Husain was described in 224 224 Shaping British medicine and society Figure 7  Dipak Ray speaking at the TUC Congress in the 1970s. 1983 by the Guardian as ‘one of the architects’ of a BMA plan aimed at reducing the numbers of migrant doctors coming to the UK which was being given

in Migrant architects of the NHS
Abstract only
James E. Moran

://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G14/031/20/PDF/G1403120.pdf?OpenElement . 7 Ibid ., paragraph 14. 8 S. Wildeman, ‘Protecting rights and building capacities: challenges to global mental health policy in light of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities’, Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics , 41:1 (2013), 48–73; S. Wilson, ‘Mental capacity legislation in the UK: Systematic review of the experiences of adults lacking capacity and their carers’, British Journal of Psychiatry Bulletin , 41:5 (2017), 260–6; J. Craigie, ‘A fine

in Madness on trial
Julian M. Simpson

described to him a matter of months after the start of the NHS. Lawrence, who was born in South Africa to South Asian ­parents decided to stay in Britain after marrying a white British woman. Returning to South Africa was not an option because of the apartheid regime’s policy on marriages between people classed as belonging to different ‘races’. In an interview in 1999 for the Millennium Memory 153 From ‘pairs of hands’ to family doctors153 Bank project, he recalled the way in which his options in the new NHS were presented to him by his superior: I discussed this with

in Migrant architects of the NHS
Julian M. Simpson

31 1 The making of a cornerstone Before exploring in detail the way in which migrant South Asian doctors shaped general practice and the NHS, I first want to situate their story within the broader context of the history of British healthcare, empire and of post-​war migration to the UK. The role of migrant doctors in the NHS is not confined to general practice. They were disproportionately represented in junior positions, less prestigious types of medicine and in geographical areas that were unpopular with local medical graduates. I will say more about the

in Migrant architects of the NHS