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at all. Elder Dempster, however, was not satisfied to allow mental patients returning home to travel entirely on their own recognisance. Although Elder Dempster had been repatriating mental patients from the UK and in between British West African territories since the early twentieth century, there does not seem to have been a particular policy in place for such repatriations until after the Second

in Beyond the state
The short history of Indian doctors in the Colonial Medical Service, British East Africa

representing the state locally were changeable. What was considered in one decade to be fitting to the times was evidently thought not to be appropriate in another. As such, this contribution to the history of Indians in the East African Colonial Medical Service highlights the way that colonial staffing policies were shaped by factors that went beyond the organisational effectiveness or the practical

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Looking beyond the state

to its public. All recruitment to the African services in London was white recruitment and the other doctors and medical personnel that were recruited for jobs were appointed locally, somewhat quietly, away from the official centralised record keeping. The Colonial Service was very strict in its policy of employing only doctors of European parentage to work in Africa; it would not have done to publicise that in the colonies

in Beyond the state
The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda

worked collaboratively, and at times dialectically, with a number of social scientists. These anthropologists and psychologists tended to view childhood malnutrition as a symptom of a wider malaise, Africans’ imperfect adaptation to colonial modernity. 54 This was a topic of general concern to British policy makers in Africa from the late 1930s as a series of strikes, damning reports of the destructive social impact

in Beyond the state

British medical control was hindered by the perplexing range of indigenous behaviour towards matters of health, making any blanket public health policy frustratingly difficult to conceive, apply and police. In Zanzibar ‘Africa, Arabia and Asia seem to meet and blend’, bemoaned one medical commentator in 1924, directly creating ‘all kinds of sanitary questions … in consequence’. 7

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940

in colonial Africa. 7 This is due in part to early historians of medicine in Uganda, admittedly some themselves missionaries, who have stressed the debt of the colonial administration to the pioneer medical work and research started by Albert Ruskin Cook. 8 It also stems from the extensive collection of records deposited by the CMS in archives at the University of Birmingham (UK), the Wellcome

in Beyond the state
Crucial collaboration, hidden conflicts

government tsetse and sleeping sickness policies. For Prentice, tsetse and consequently sleeping sickness depended ‘entirely upon the presence of big game’, which had increased as a result of government policies of game protection that had deprived Africans of their hunting rights. In his annual report for 1910, Prentice stated that each victim of sleeping sickness, or ‘tsetse fever’, was ‘a martyr to our

in Beyond the state

Robinson, ‘The imperialism of decolonisation’,  The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History , 22:3 (1994), 462–511; Gordon Cumming, Aid to Africa: French and British Policies from the Cold War to the New Millennium (Abingdon: Routledge, 2017); Charlotte Lydia Riley, ‘“Tropical Allsorts”: the transnational flavor of British development policies in Africa’, Journal of World History , 26:4 (2016), 839–864. 51 Parry, ‘Think of the

in British civic society at the end of empire

the campaign in 1963, the Cabinet Committee on Development Policy expressed concerns about the increasingly expansionist tendencies of the FAO, criticising the unwelcome influence that it sought to exert on British aid policy. 11 By the 1960s, Britain was just one country among more than a hundred taking part in the FFHC and this inevitably raised questions about its changing status within a rapidly growing field. As Earl De La Warr, former Chairman of the Royal Commonwealth Society (RCS) and Chairman of the UK National FFHC Committee warned, ‘it is up to us in the

in British civic society at the end of empire

Decolonisation: The Conservative Party and British Colonial Policy in Tropical Africa, 1951–1964 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), pp. 53, 197. 35 Commonwealth Journal , 4:1 (1961), 4. Italics in original. 36 Enoch Powell called the Commonwealth a ‘gigantic farce’ in an

in British civic society at the end of empire