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Reaching settlement in Northern Ireland

, politicians may need to wait for popular support to redefine identities before they can alter institutions (e.g. the constitution) or change policy. Furthermore, territoriality leads to the use of military force as an allocation mechanism – a way to distribute a contested good.27 Other allocation mechanisms exist, but the involved disputants will need to alter their position to locate alternative means to achieve their objective. In particular, disputants will need to believe that negotiation is a more acceptable mechanism than military force for managing their disputed

in Theories of International Relations and Northern Ireland

road, passing unseen gnarled transformer towers, charred roof tiles, smashed windows, structures bent at crazy angles, bridges broken in half, the intellect could not function. At night, there was no rational order, because without seeing, you cannot order, but you can imagine. And imagining is sometimes worse than seeing, because seeing allows you to find the parameters of something – allows you to delineate things – whereas imagining has no parameters, and because it goes on and on long after the seeing is finished.12 It keeps me awake at night. I waited in the

in The ethics of researching war
From campaign imagery to contemporary art
Julia Gallagher and V. Y. Mudimbe

whilst waiting for something that might come, rather than form a queue for something that is certain. Water shortages affect those in rural areas as well as large cities. Faults in valves and pipes inside bore holes as well as inappropriate pumping mechanisms are to blame with government funds allocated to address the problems ( Capital, 2013 ). Evident in figure 9.3 , the resulting abstract paintings are large and arresting. Bold brushwork covers large canvases with a delicate intuition that suggests that he is simultaneously observing from the periphery, watching

in Images of Africa

Dnepropetrovsk to be burned alive. As some tried to escape the flames by jumping out of the second story windows, the soldiers were waiting in the courtyard below with guns at the ready. Karl testifies: ‘Behind the windows of the second floor, I saw a man with a small child in his arms. His clothes were alight. By his side stood a woman, doubtless the mother of the child. With his free hand the man covered the child’s eyes . . . then he jumped into the street. Seconds later the mother followed. Then from the other windows fell burning bodies . . . We shot.’24 For several hours

in The ethics of researching war
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Northern Ireland’s unique history with DDR

3 Under the gun: Northern Ireland’s unique history with DDR Carolyn Gallaher Although official peace came to Northern Ireland in 1998, the conflict’s nonstate combatants took their time leaving the battlefield. The largest republican paramilitary, the Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA), waited seven years to decommission its weapons and stand down its men.1 Loyalist paramilitaries waited even longer. The two largest groups, the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) and the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), took nine years to issue stand down orders and eleven and

in Theories of International Relations and Northern Ireland
Representations of the body in South African fiction and film
Julia Gallagher and V. Y. Mudimbe

positive status has rendered him effectively dead, his narrative belongs to a character who no longer believes he is alive or has any reason to live, other than to do the bidding of the virus now thriving in his body. Each section of the ‘Book of the Dead’ is divided into the names of his targets. Interspersed with these chapters are four sections penned by the virus and numbered I, II, III, IV. In fact the virus first appears in Chapter 12 of the ‘Book of the Living’: I live amongst you, waiting like a predator. I am faceless

in Images of Africa

rested casually on your rifle in the high hills around Sarajevo? What can it mean, then, that these are the same eyes that sought, found, and followed the figure of the person through the cross hairs – perhaps carrying his own gun, or perhaps waiting in line for a loaf of bread, or a kilogram of flour? What could it mean to say that this is the same hand that mapped the trajectory before firing the mortar round into the side of a building that slid away like a slice of butter from the perspective of your distance, with just the far-away echo of the explosion and the

in The ethics of researching war
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Vietnam is encapsulated in a poem composed by Ho Chi Minh around 1940, likening Lenin to a stream and Marx to a mountain waiting to be ‘united into one country’ (Ho, cited in Bradley 2000 , 110). This links the fathers of international communism to familiar mythological themes, reminiscent in particular of the Vietnamese founding legend of Âu Cơ and Lạc Long Quân, mountain fairy and water god respectively. It is typical of the

in Soldered states
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I will have destroyed them. Kujundžić’s photograph, like all representation, is not outside the sphere of intentionality and of ethics. It has a context. In the summer of 1998, with the international community threatening armed intervention against Serbian military and paramilitary forces in the midst of a looming war, Kujundžić has not photographed the twisted bodies of the latest victims of fighting or massacres. He has not sought out the line-up of men and women outside the morgues waiting to identify the brutalized body of a son or daughter or parent. He

in The ethics of researching war

States encourage productive nation-​building? Where, when and how should it refrain and wait? These are the core questions that must underpin a successful policy-​making process. These are the core questions that will turn the intellectual assumptions held by Americans into a prudent platform for nurturing a truly better world, at least from the American point of view. The contradictions between ideals and interests will not disappear, but they can be managed to better effect in the United States and abroad. Notes 1 C.  Vann Woodward, The Strange Career of Jim Crow

in American foreign policy