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The British monarchy in Australia, New Zealand and Canada, 1991–2016
Mark McKenna

As the Queen approaches her ninetieth birthday, republicans in both major political parties have reached a consensus in recent years that there will be no move towards a republic until the post-Elizabethan era. Agreeing to wait until the monarch dies, they hope that the last residue of attachment to the monarchy will die with her, if it has not died already. During the Queen’s past four visits to

in Crowns and colonies
The builders of the Caribbean empire
Benjamin Steiner

prepared by cutting down trees without any regard to their size and then setting fire to the dry stumps. Thus, those trees suitable for construction were burned, too. The European inhabitants of Martinique, Labat tells us, copied the Caribs in this technique – a procedure the chronicler found to be disadvantageous to the island's environment and economy. Only a few people would conserve the large trees for making boards, beams, and other items and selling them for considerable profit. They would wait for certain moon phases to chop them down, keeping the timber in stacks

in Building the French empire, 1600–1800
The metropole
Katie Donington

, provided George with the means to embrace full manhood through marriage. Financially cautious middle-class men tended to wait until they were capable of supporting a household and dependants before contemplating matrimony. Having previously furnished his son with £1,500, Robert senior left George land in Holbeck, Leeds, and a further £1,000. 22 The land and capital given to George

in The bonds of family
Abstract only
Nicola Ginsburgh

involved. Fears over African incursion were often articulated through the physical and representational contest over space, which included attempts to erase Africans from the pavement, the workplace, the city and the suburbs, as well as social clubs, railway platforms and carriages, hospitals and schools. White workers’ desires for African elimination from the labour process was hampered by capital’s reliance on cheap African labour in the region, a lack of whites to fulfil all available positions, and their own desires to be waited upon by black domestic servants

in Class, work and whiteness
Katie Donington

abolitionists whom he looks upon as equally enemies in the event to the monarchy and to the Peace of the Kingdom. This I had from him a few days ago at the House of Lords when I waited on him respecting the Merchants Petition. 26 George’s words revealed the degree to which the anti-abolitionists were supported by the royal family, who

in The bonds of family
Nicola Ginsburgh

embody. This chapter ends with the argument that the complex material and psychological threats presented by majority rule and the increasing disruption to established social hierarchies were experienced as castration anxiety among white male workers. Job fragmentation and class fissures The image of a classless society in which every European lounged beside swimming pools waited upon by servants was manufactured by Rhodesian authorities to attract whites to the colony. Yet, even the most ardent defenders of a myth of white homogeneity occasionally slipped into

in Class, work and whiteness
Nicola Ginsburgh

out strike action. 29 The arrest of Northern Rhodesia Mine Workers’ Union General Secretary Frank Maybank, incarcerated for ‘subversive activities’ and leading a strike of white miners, elicited widespread condemnation from white trade unionists in Southern Rhodesia. 30 Loyalty to the war effort, it seemed, did not supersede loyalty to other white British workers. Moreover, support for the war itself was not always evident. The Granite Review repeatedly printed material from a female anti-war group. One article urged white women not to ‘wait for the men’ to

in Class, work and whiteness
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Katie Donington

their deceased uncle John senior. Robert junior is key to understanding the Hibberts’ mercantile world in Kingston. Throughout his life he kept a diary in which he noted down both social and familial events, as well as his business dealings. The diaries provide a unique insight into the daily routine of a slave factor, giving details of the endless waiting for ships to come in

in The bonds of family
The colony
Katie Donington

waited eagerly for the new arrival. There was a false alarm on 15 June, but the danger of a premature birth passed and after weeks of anticipation Thomas was finally born on 29 July 1788. 100 A month later the child was given over to the care of a nurse. 101 The children’s health was a serious and regular concern for both parents. Sore throats, disorders of the bowel, fever, chicken pox, boils, thrush in the

in The bonds of family
Nicola Ginsburgh

this system had created unemployment and threatened the ability of white workers to lay claim to their presumed racial superiority. Vambe hints at white workers’ envy of African landholdings and their position of semi-proletarianisation. White wage labourers had no such security; there was no plot of land waiting for them; they had to find work, emigrate or accept state relief. This must have been particularly galling; whites, whose self-identification as the productive driving force in the country, creating wealth and prosperity on what would otherwise be

in Class, work and whiteness