Search results

C. E. Beneš

; then bruneti , which were smaller than bruni ; and lastly genovini , which are used now. 17 In the year of the Lord 1140 the people of Ventimiglia rebelled, so the Genoese went there with a great army of infantry, cavalry, and sailors. They besieged the city by both sea and land, took it by force, and made those in both the city and the surrounding area swear perpetual loyalty to the

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

untroubled in their shadow. 14 But the Carthaginians and Africans rebelled against the Romans, and often caused them many losses and damages. 15 And at that time in Carthage there were two brave and famous men, namely Hannibal, who was king of the Carthaginians, and his brother Mago. 16 These two gathered a large army against the Romans by both

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

when Cornelius Scipio was sent to Spain with a large army, he ordered all sources of pleasure and incentives to lust completely removed from the army. 40 Hence the prostitutes had to retreat two miles away. For this diligent man knew that pleasure feminises manly minds, while diminishing and sapping strengths of iron. So, for example, once when Alexander was still a young man he was singing to his lyre, but his

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

aforementioned emperor divided his army into two parts. 68 One part he gave to his uncle Bernard to advance against Desiderius, who was in the regions of Lombardy. Accordingly Bernard went: he put this Desiderius to flight and pursued him as far as Pavia, where he captured him and exiled him to Lyons with his wife and children. Then King Charles sent the remaining part of the army to Genoa to defend the lands of the coast from the

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

) requested the Genoese to send an army of ships to recover the city—and in obedience to him the Genoese sent out to Syria forty galleys strongly armed as stated above. Thus in the year of the Lord 1099, with a great army of Franks ( Gallici ) and other pilgrims under Duke Godfrey of Bouillon, they came to Antioch and took it by force, giving great thanks to God. 22 Then the Saracens gathered up a great army and returned to Antioch

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Thus the Greeks besieged Troy, a most famous and powerful city, with a strong army, and they captured the besieged city, and utterly destroyed the captured city. For this reason, because of the glory of this victory, the Greeks took to counting their years from the capture of Troy. Just as the Jews count their years from the liberation out of Egypt or the handing down of the law; the Romans count from the foundation of the City [i.e. Rome]; and

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

world. I do with a small boat the same thing that you do with an enormous navy. My lack of wealth has made me a brigand, but your pride and greed have made you the same’. Delighted with this response, Alexander had him enrolled in the army, and ordered a sufficient salary allotted to him so that in future he would have no occasion or cause for piracy. Thus bad rulers do not have the credibility to punish evildoers. This is why, when the judges of Athens ordered

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

. These cities were built 350 years before the advent of Christ in the fifth age of the world, around the time of King Ahasuerus and Queen Esther, as far as can be clearly understood from the ancient histories and chronicles. 16 And afterward these aforesaid Swabians and Senones went to Rome and besieged it even up to the Capitoline. From there, the Romans shot arrows into their army. And when they ran out of cord, they cut off the tails

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

freely to his soldiers and his poor for the use of his army. Let the king have the public domain 33 to dispense of freely for the benefit of his army, and let Christ have the property of the churches, like another public domain, to be entrusted to his faithful assistants for the use of the needy and his servants. And let it be the responsibility of the king for it to be entrusted to those who will faithfully administer it and wisely make provision for it, so that all may glorify God and rejoice in Christ as much for the promises of what is to come as for the

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
Abstract only
Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

‘internal’ just because it is dominated by monastic themes and issues. As we said earlier, there was nothing internal about the reputation of prominent Carolingian monasteries and their political leadership, and the same holds true for contested monastic property. Wealthy abbeys such as Corbie were closely connected to the royal court, and the revenues of its estates helped to sustain the king’s armies. Although Radbert had precise ideas about the limits of the claims rulers could make to the lands of the monasteries to which they extended their protection ( tuitio ), he

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire