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La Pucelle

This book collects together for the first time in English the major documents relating to the life and contemporary reputation of Joan of Arc. Also known as La Pucelle, she led a French Army against the English in 1429, arguably turning the course of the war in favour of the French king Charles VII. The story of Joan of Arc has continued to elicit an extraordinary range of reactions throughout almost six centuries since her death. Her story ended tragically in 1431 when she was put on trial for heresy and sorcery by an ecclesiastical court and was burned at the stake. The book shows how the trial, which was organised by her enemies, provides an important window into late medieval attitudes towards religion and gender. Joan was effectively persecuted by the established Church for her supposedly non-conformist views on spirituality and the role of women. She was ransomed by her captors to their English allies who in turn handed her over to the Church to be tried and finally executed for heresy at Rouen on 30 May 1431. This slur against her reputation would remain until her friends and acquaintances gave evidence before a Nullification trial that eventually overturned the earlier judgement against her on 7 July 1456. The textual records of the Nullification trial also present problems for modern scholars, parallel to those for the original Rouen trial.

E.A. Jones

instruction, and I do not write for such people, but only to the imperfect who aspire to the greatest degree of perfection, for to such people the solitary life is very dangerous – which is no wonder when someone has set out to fight continually until death against all possible temptations and the terrifying army of wicked spirits. And therefore this life requires and demands someone perfect, concerning which the Wise Man says: ‘I

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550

Archbishop Wulfstan of York is among the most important legal and political thinkers of the early Middle Ages. A leading ecclesiastic, innovative legislator, and influential royal councilor, Wulfstan witnessed firsthand the violence and social unrest that culminated in the fall of the English monarchy before the invading armies of Cnut in 1016. This book introduces the range of Wulfstan's political writings and sheds light on the development of English law during the early eleventh century. In his homilies and legal tracts, Wulfstan offered a searing indictment of the moral failures that led to England’s collapse and formulated a vision of an ideal Christian community that would influence English political thought long after the Anglo-Saxon period had ended. More than just dry political theory, however, Wulfstan’s works are composed in the distinctive voice of someone who was both a confidante of kings and a preacher of apocalyptic fervour. No other source so vividly portrays the political life of eleventh-century England: what it was, and what one man believed it could be.

1039 Emperor Conrad died in Utrecht on the second day of Whitsuntide 1 and his son Henry succeeded him. 2 Abbot Richard of Fulda died 3 and Sigeward succeeded him. 4 Bishop Reginbold of Speyer died 5 and Sibicho succeeded him. 6 1040 King Henry led an army into Bohemia and there Count Werner 7 and Reginhard, the standard-bearer of Fulda, 8

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld
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conspiracy of the Saxons and the march on the Harzburg in 1073; the capture of royal castles by the Saxon rebels in 1073–4; the rebellion of the citizens of Cologne against Archbishop Anno in 1074; the battle of Homburg in 1075; the conflict within the Saxon rebel army, when ‘the common people’ opposed the princes in 1075; the Saxon and Thuringian debate about continued resistance and their surrender to the

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld

will suffer neither war nor hunger, and your enemies’ army will not trouble you. I will also give you the strength for victory and such great power that you, for sport, will defeat or disperse as many of your enemies as you can count. 7 I will counsel you and greatly exalt you, and make known my friendship with true faith, grant you happiness and great favour, have you as a thegn, and be

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
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principal ecclesiastical foundations of the previous century lay in ruins, and Viking armies occupied the majority of northern, central, and eastern Britain. When a young Alfred assumed the throne of Wessex in 871, he ruled little more than a rump state, which was further reduced by Viking victories over the first seven years of his reign. 20 Despite early setbacks, however, Alfred won significant

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
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field on army service, or are doing castle-guard. ii. A burgess may not distrain on another burgess without the permission of the reeve. iii. If a burgess shall lend anything in the borough to someone dwelling outside, the debtor shall pay back the debt if he admit it, or otherwise do right in the court of the borough. iv

in Towns in medieval England
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The documents in this section consist of Wulfstan’s political tracts, those texts the archbishop composed either for public circulation or as private memoranda with the purpose of articulating or advocating for some aspect of his social vision.

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York

Wulfstan. 3 The chief interest of this homily lies in the way in which it revises the specific prescriptions of VII Æthelred for general application. 4 VII Æthelred decreed a series of penitential rituals to be undertaken as a response to the 1009 invasion of England by a Viking army under the leadership of Thurkil the Tall. 5 Here, mentions of the

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York