This book argues for a cultural, rather than a sociological or economic, approach to understand how immigrants become part of new country. It argues that the language used to talk about immigration determines the kinds of things that can be said about it. In contrast to the language of integration or assimilation which evaluates an immigrant’s success in relation to a static endpoint (e.g. integrated or not), ‘settling’ makes it possible to see how immigrants and their descendants engage in an ongoing process of adaptation. In order to understand this process of settling, it is important to pay particular attention to immigrants not only as consumers, but also as producers of culture, since artistic production provides a unique and nuanced perspective on immigrants’ sense of home and belonging, especially within the multi-generational process of settling. In order to anchor these larger theoretical questions in actual experience, this book looks at music, theatre and literature by artists of Turkish immigrant origin in France.

4 University teacher education and the pop-up art school Christine Jarvis and Sarah Williamson Genesis J ohnson (2010: 26) argues that most ideas ‘do not happen in a flash’ but rather form as a result of the ‘adjacent possible’, a term coined to describe the notion that ideas are only ‘built out of a collection of existing parts’ at a certain time. The pop-up art schools (PUAS) at the University of Huddersfield, the focus of this chapter, resulted from an eclectic collection of temporary and alternative cultural, social and retail events at a particular time

in Lifelong learning, the arts and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university
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Settling in

positive and more historically problematic term of ‘settler’. In common parlance, the term ‘settler’ calls to mind those who represented a colonial enterprise in which they occupied positions of power in the colony and displaced indigenous people, as in the United States, Australia or Algeria. However poor or marginalised 2 Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home they may have been in their country of origin, in the context of settler society, they wielded more power than do present-day economic and political immigrants who move to a more prosperous country

in Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home in France
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Karagöz’s cultural and linguistic migration

powerful or marginalised that do not survive in the archive, but may indeed be present in the repertoire. This is a particularly useful approach to looking at the cultural production of immigrant communities. While it is tempting to view the archive as dead, with little or only oppressive relevance to the oppressed, Taylor convincingly argues that the interaction of the archive and the repertoire allow for individuals 78 Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home to use the archive to create new meanings. To describe this interaction, Taylor uses the idea of the

in Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home in France

The after-effects of mass atrocity – bodies and bones – struggle to be defined within memorial projects. This article seeks to examine the politics at play in displaying dead bodies to interrogate the role of materiality in efforts to memorialise and raise awareness about on-going violences. It focusses on the nexus between evidence, dignity, humanity and memory to explore bone display in Rwanda. It then takes up two artistic projects that play on the materiality of human remains after atrocity: the art of Carl Michael von Hausswolff, who took ashes from an urn at the Majdanek concentration camp and used them as the material for his painting, and the One Million Bones Project, an installation that exhibits ceramic bones to raise awareness about global violence. In thinking about the intersections between human biomatter, art and politics, the article seeks to raise questions about both production and consumption: how bones and ashes of the dead are produced, and how they are consumed by viewers when placed on display in a variety of ways.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
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Settling in

see patterns in the artists’ work in terms of audience and approach. On the one hand, for some artists, such as C-it and Kebab Show, their art has an explicitly activist purpose, in which they seek to speak directly to immigrants from Turkey and their descendants and make them aware of social issues affecting their lives in France. They have said in interviews that they expect (however indirectly) to inspire political and social awareness, as well as action. On the other hand, while artists such as Ayşe Şahin and Ruşen Yıldız certainly raise questions of identity

in Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home in France
Humour and narrative control on stage with Ayşe Şahin

hostility and desire remove the need to repress those emotions and the excess energy is released as laughter. While Freud’s emphasis on psychic energies (which in some ways seems surprisingly close to ancient Greek notions of the ‘humours’) fails to persuade many present-day scholars, the idea that jokes provide a safe space in which to address topics that are normally off limits does seem to describe lived experience. 62 Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home Second, disparagement or superiority theory focuses on aggression and triumph over an opponent, where

in Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home in France

’, based on interviews with upwardly mobile middle-class young people from immigrant families, Jean Beaman (2012) underscores the social exclusion 30 Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home that persists in spite of professional and economic success. Her interviewees, with family origins in North Africa, still find it difficult, for example, to rent an apartment, no matter what their financial status may be. While the media often recount anecdotes of exclusion and discrimination, statistically, it is more difficult to substantiate, as French law prohibits

in Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home in France
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Texts and contexts in the Kebab Show theatre troupe

hope to be. Accepting that the migrant writer (and indeed migrants generally) experience the loss of space and then act in order to compensate for that loss, this chapter argues that immigrant theatre provides a context in which space and narrative can come together in productive ways. 46 Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home It might be objected that it is misleading to use Said’s work on exilic writers to discuss the work of immigrant theatre, but this would ignore the many similarities in the lives of exiles and immigrants. It is often difficult in

in Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home in France

Derrida’s comments, especially regarding the ‘address to the other’, suggest something more radical, not just the use of a particular language, but of language in general: in the context in which hospitality is to be offered, any question, any communication at all, limits the possibility of unconditional hospitality. 94 Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home Mireille Rosello, in her book Postcolonial Hospitality, draws on Derrida’s work to discuss hospitality in postcolonial and immigrant contexts, focusing in particular on the display of ownership and power

in Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home in France