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Vivienne Westbrook

12 Ralegh’s image in art 1 Vivienne Westbrook I shall call the protagonist of this story ‘Ralegh’.1 I do not like to call him ‘Sir Walter’: as such he seems no more than a cliché, a posture, an adornment of English Heritage biscuit-tins and humorous No Smoking signs. He is caught in the dead space of recurrence. He is forever having to lay down his cloak in the mud, to parley with red-skinned Indians, to puff ­elabourately on a long clay-pipe. The pipe is his trademark, as familiar as Florence Nightingale’s lamp and Nelson’s empty sleeve.2 Introduction In

in Literary and visual Ralegh
Mark Robson

discourse to encompass any form of symbolic interaction that is susceptible to (literary-) critical analysis. As Catherine Gallagher and Greenblatt have argued: In the analysis of the larger cultural field, canonical works of art are brought into relation not only with works judged as minor, but

in The sense of early modern writing
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Building a woman’s house
Sara L. French

, despite her ‘lifetime’s experience of building’.4 Whereas in one paragraph Girouard acknowledges Bess’s experience, in the next he dismisses her ability, noting that ‘one only has to compare the old with the new Hardwick to see how Smythson transformed her overbearing and somewhat crude preferences into a work of art’.5 His dismissal of the variety and inventiveness of the decoration at Hardwick Old Hall also discounts the fact that the old hall includes a transverse hall, the new hall’s most distinct and memorable feature. Girouard’s view also reflects assumptions

in Bess of Hardwick

Sir Walter Raleigh's literary legacy consists of a highly fragmented oeuvre including many unprinted or pirated poems and works of disputed authorship. No collection of Raleigh's poetry produced under his own direction or that of a contemporary, either in print or in manuscript, exists. This book is a collection of essays by scholars from Great Britain, the United States, Canada and Taiwan that covers a wide range of topics about Raleigh's diversified career and achievements. Some essays shed light on less familiar facets such as Raleigh as a father and as he is represented in paintings, statues, and in movies. Others re-examine him as poet, historian, as a controversial figure in Ireland during Elizabeth's reign, and looks at his complex relationship with and patronage of Edmund Spenser. The theme of Raleigh's poem is a mutability that is political: i.e., the precariousness of the ageing courtier's estate, as revealed by his fall from eminence and the loss of his privileged position in court. The Cynthia holograph engages in complex ways with idealistic pastoral, a genre predicated upon the pursuit of otium (a longing for the ideal and an escape from the actual). The Nymph's reply offers a reminder of the power of time and death to ensure the failure of that attempt. There were patrilineal imperatives that might have shaped Raleigh's views of sovereignty. Raleigh's story is an actor's story, one crafted by its own maker for the world-as-stage.

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Mark Robson

representation produced, and images are accorded value by Morison in respect of their approximation to the known details of More’s life and death. For Morison the origin of the work of art, then, may be located in the known and remembered world, a world in which memory functions unproblematically as a transparent and stable faculty which records in a literal (rather than a figural

in The sense of early modern writing
Religion, revolution, and the end of history in Dryden’s late works
Matthew C. Augustine

erred in seeing the conversion as no more than a political expedient: it greatly deepened the impact of the Revolution on Dryden’s art, permanently reorienting his metaphysical compass, and in ways that seriously complicate the supposed triumph of Augustan values in politics and poetry. More broadly, my opening asks us to reconsider the place of religion and of spiritual politics in the Restoration, an era that has long been seen as the dawning of an Enlightenment culture of secularism and moderation. As Philip Connell has observed, ‘We continue

in Aesthetics of contingency
Bryan White

Despite experiments in the 1650s, through-sung opera failed to gain a firm foothold in Restoration England. Explanations for this circumstance have focussed on English taste, the finances of London’s theatre companies, and the popularity of native ‘dramatick opera’. While these were obstacles to the progress of through-sung opera in England, they do not explain why Thomas Betterton and the United Company ventured a rumoured £4000 on the production of Dryden’s and Grabu’s Albion and Albanius (1685). The lack of royal patronage has been overlooked as a barrier to the development of opera in England. Charles II displayed an ambivalent attitude to through-sung opera (English or otherwise) throughout his reign. His reticence to provide direct financial support was the most significant factor in the failure of the art form to find an important place in English culture of the Restoration period.

in From Republic to Restoration
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The sense of early modern writing
Mark Robson

, and continues to be, of the greatest influence in the determination of concepts such as the aesthetic, the work of art or the concept of history. 2 The sense of early modern writing , then, is concerned both with rhetoric, poetics and aesthetics as they are to be found in early modern texts, and equally with the thought that allows us to make sense of the early modern as a conceptual category. Having

in The sense of early modern writing
Mark Robson

clearly expressed in his Gorgias . Precisely because it is an art of persuasion, there is always the suspicion that this is rhetoric’s only concern. In other words, there is no necessity for the rhetorician to be interested in truth, only in what will prove persuasive. 15 In the Gorgias , a clear distinction is made between a form of persuasion that is designed to ensure

in The sense of early modern writing
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Mark Robson

. This discussion was guided by an emphasis on the notion of the aesthetic in broad terms, that is, on a generalised sense of art that went beyond modern conceptions of ‘literature’. In part, this was led by a historical appreciation of the problems surrounding the identification of a category that we might call literature in the early modern period. But it was also partly the

in The sense of early modern writing