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Tracing relatedness and diversity in the Albanian–Montenegrin borderland

local identity politics. 12 The equivalent emic expression is rodjak (or the diminutive rodjo). 13 The extermination of converts by Prince Danilo, which is the central theme of Njegoš’s epic poem, lacks historical validity (Djilas 1966). Conversion to Islam was contested, but remains an integral part of Montenegro’s history. 14 http://www.rastko.rs/knjizevnost/umetnicka/njegos/mountain_wreath.html#meet ing. Travelling genealogies 99 15 See below for reflections on the gender dimensions of this process. 16 The introduction of the Bajraktar title can also be seen as

in Migrating borders and moving times

agreement about the socially cathartic potential of exhumations, these are processes that can be unusually problematic (see Renshaw 2010) and enormously contested, as was illustrated by the Chibondo events, which I turn to below. This is particularly the case where the identity of the dead and the manner of their deaths are uncertain. In the exhumations of mass graves at Chimoio, Nyadzonia, Freedom camp and other former guerrilla camps in Zambia and Mozambique, the political identity of the dead and the manner of their deaths were hardly in dispute, even Remaking the

in Governing the dead

and Miller 2006) showed how new innovations were channelled into long-established national and personal projects of freedom. The internet in particular took on a utopian representation that conjoined personal and market freedom with ideas of global mobility and identity, giving it ‘a symbolic totality as well as a practical multiplicity’ (Miller and Slater 2000: 16). The same can be said about today’s Engineering ethnography 83 growing flow of data, powered by mutual improvements to internet services and mobile devices. The internet was once the domain of the

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
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The bodyand counter-revolutionary warfare inapartheid South Africa

Apartheid South Africa  205 The war comes home Among the many omissions laid at the door of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) is the absence of statistics indicating the number of persons killed as a result of political violence during the thirty-four-year period covered by its remit (1 March 1960 to 10 May 1994). This seems surprising for a commission specifically mandated to discover the ‘nature, causes and extent of gross violations of human rights’4 – of which killing was one such violation – and to determine the identity of both victims and

in Destruction and human remains
Mass graves in post-war Malaysia

sook ching (purge through cleansing) massacres  – has become symbolic of Japanese brutality. The death toll from these massacres remains contested; estimates range from 5,000 to 50,000.2 As a result, multiple mass graves scar the territory’s landscape. While these serve as physical testament to this dark period in the country’s history, many of these sites remain relatively unknown and scarcely remembered.3 Often, documented cases of exhumations – be it Bergen-Belsen in Germany, Vinnytsia in Ukraine, or Priaranza in Spain, to name but a few sites where mass graves

in Human remains and identification
Archives and collecting on the frontiers of data-driven science

, in order to understand these new data-driven landscapes in science, we need to pay attention not only to their archival tendencies but also to the contested spaces in which data collection happens, shaped by accidents as much as intentions, coloured by liminality, contingency and uncertainty. We might think ‘If everything is information’ 113 of these spaces of data collection as ‘frontiers’, though it should be noted that I do not use the languages of ‘frontiers’ in order to bolster the much-criticised analytic of the centre and the periphery (Anderson 2002

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
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Crossing borders, changing times

families and the provision of moral and emotional support: the relationship between truth and distance’, Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, 14(4): 385–409. 22 Migrating borders and moving times Baud, M. and W. van Schendel (1997) ‘Toward a comparative history of borderlands’, Journal of World History, 8(2): 211–242. Berdahl, D. (1999) Where the World Ended: Re-Unification and Identity in the German Borderland. Berkeley: University of California Press. Bigo, D. (2011) ‘Freedom and speed in enlarged borderzones’, in V. Squire (ed.), The Contested Politics

in Migrating borders and moving times
The forensic and political lives of secondary mass graves in Bosnia and Herzegovina

aims to explore the particular agency of the phenomenon of the secondary mass grave in the network of associations that constitutes the contested ground of BiH’s memory politics. Why might a secondary mass grave play a distinct role from a primary mass grave, and in what ways, and for whom? Through an (admittedly implicit) description of the actor-network in which these graves are embedded, and the many sorts of actants with which they 144   Admir Jugo and Sari Wastell are in relation, the authors will attempt to describe the precarious and shifting place of Bosnia

in Human remains and identification
Contested narratives of the independence struggle in postconfl ict Timor-Leste

6 Claiming the dead, defining the nation: contested narratives of the independence struggle in post-conflict Timor-Leste1 Henri Myrttinen Introduction Timor-Leste’s struggle for independence (1975–99) cost the lives of more than 108,000 people, the majority of them unarmed civilians. Throughout the period of the Indonesian occupation, a small armed resistance movement, the Falintil (Forças Armadas de Libertação Nacional de Timor-Leste) fought militarily against the occupation forces, supported by a civilian resistance network. With independence, a new national

in Governing the dead
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Theoretical approaches

causes abjection but what disturbs identity, system, order. What does not respect borders, positions, rules’ (1982: 4). Against biological explanations of the repulsion that dead bodies produce, Kristeva holds that the abject and abjection are ‘primers of culture’ that draw us ‘toward the place where meaning collapses’, a place beyond discourse. The abject does not signify death: ‘No, as in true theatre … refuse and corpses show me what I permanently thrust aside in order to live’ (1982: 2). In Kernaghan’s interpretation (2009; this volume), the Peruvian Shining Path

in Governing the dead