Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for :

  • contested identities x
  • Archaeology and Heritage x
Clear All

Zealand’s New National Museum’, in D.J. Walkowitz and L. Maya Knauer (eds), Contested Histories in Public Space: Memory, Race, and Nation (Durham, NC, and London: Duke University Press, 2009), pp. 49–70. 32 J. Phillips, ‘Our History, Our Selves: The Historian and National Identity’, New Zealand Journal of History, 30:2 (1996), 107–32. 33 B. Labrum, ‘Thinking Visually: Doing History in Museums’, in B. Labrum and J. Phillips (eds), Going Public: The Changing Face of New Zealand History (Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2001), pp. 176–86. 34 B. Attwood, ‘Difficult

in Curatopia
Learning from Māori curatorship pastand present

beyond categories such as colonial and even postcolonial, as well as traditional notions of Indigeneity, towards what the anthropologist Jeffrey Sissons has called ‘postindigenous’.39 In the cultural sphere, as Hakiwai’s PhD thesis demonstrates, the same resilience, tenacity and dynamism is apparent in programmes for music, language, visual arts and heritage, all of which shape and are shaped by the evolving identity of 219 220 Pacific Ngāi Tahu people.40 Hana O’Regan, for example, sees her Ngāi Tahu identity as constantly shifting and relational: ‘identity is

in Curatopia
Abstract only
Museum historiographies

techniques. These are adumbrated in this introduction, then applied to the Manchester Museum in the chapters that follow. But why choose this particular institution? And, indeed, why study a museum at all? Too often museologists take the latter for granted. It stands reiterating that museums play a very particular role in the production and consumption of Western knowledge, in the elucidation of identity and the organisation of material culture. We should always compare the museum as a site for the production of knowledge with the laboratory, the lecture hall and the field

in Nature and culture

, performance and translation, across generations, and across fraught borders of culture and place. It was a time when we were coming to see the borders of identity as dynamic, continually transgressed and remade, in specific historical relations of power, often unequal, but never static or unidirectional. Mary Pratt’s concept of the ‘contact zone’, drawn from colonial situations of dominance and transculturation, gave me a way of reconceiving the hierarchical, authoritative spaces of the Western museum. Readers may recall that the essay ‘Museums as Contact Zones’, which

in Curatopia
Abstract only
The museum in the twentieth century

. Awarding museum things too much agency would diminish the significance of the humans in the story. Objects did not act in their own right but rather material culture was acted upon and was a conduit for human intention.3 People imbued things with value and significance, manipulating and contesting their meanings over time. Objects prompted, changed and channelled relationships but were nonetheless inanimate. Even when looking from the standpoint of the specimen we are looking at people, their practices and institutions. Throughout their ‘lives’, museum objects were

in Nature and culture

its possible The museum as method futures – imaginatively redefined by the editors and contributors to this book as ‘curatopia’ – was somehow over, neatly finished or resolved. Recent years have been marked by escalating contention around immigration, national narrative, identity, growing inequality and environmental futures. The multicultural values that museums of world cultures at least implicitly affirm are contested to an extent unprecedented in recent decades. Our ideally hushed conversations, in the company of artefacts, are sometimes drowned out by a

in Curatopia
Abstract only

curatorial practices ‘at the time’ of collection; nor from ‘the [accumulated historical] times’ of past practices known to the curator; nor from the accumulated stories the things-as-subjects have told and will be able to tell to ‘future generations’, including stories about the ways in which curators have treated them ‘over time’. This at once over-arching and Curating time cumulative time might best be characterised as archival or memory-time – and as such, time that will inevitably be political, in as much as it will have encompassed ongoing contests and

in Curatopia
Pluralism and the politics of change in Canada’s national museums

contours of the Senate Library, while to the west the long, low-slung contours of Moriyama and Teshima’s Canadian War Museum emerge from a grassy embankment. On the Quebec side of the river, the curving organic forms created by Douglas Cardinal for the Canadian Museum of History face across to the high bluff crowned by the Parliament buildings. The commissioning of Israeli-Canadian, Japanese-Canadian and Blackfoot architects to design new homes for these three museums was as emblematic of the multicultural construct of Canadian identity promoted by late twentieth

in Curatopia
Remaking the ethnographic museum in the global contemporary

. Overall, we reconsider our 2013 volume, Museum and Communities: Curators, Collections, Collaboration, with its geographical absences and silences, while addressing the complexity of identities and global entanglements within wider networks of power and control.2 We ponder activist practice since the 1970s, from the murder by arson of black teenagers in New Cross, London, where one of us has roots, to Black Lives Matter in the USA today. In our current work with fellow museum professionals in Europe and internationally, including ICOM-ICME (the International Council of

in Curatopia
An epistemology of postcolonial debate

that we should not accept these limits and boundaries, but rather make them visible, contest them and eventually transgress them. The lack of a ‘culture of debate’ in the sense mentioned above, it seems, has its roots within the discipline of anthropology or ethnology, as well as in the reality of museum practice. To start with, direct criticism of each other’s exhibitions, for example, is generally not very common, as Boris Wastiau, currently director of the Musée d’ethnographie de Genève, has pointed out.17 This is particularly true for German-speaking ethnological

in Curatopia