Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 162 items for :

  • corporate identity x
  • Literature and Theatre x
Clear All
Abstract only
Work, narrative and identity in a market age
Author: Angela Lait

The global financial crisis of the early twenty-first century focused attention on the processes that sustain the excesses of corporate capitalism. This book gives an account of the role played by literature in human subjectivity and identity under the working conditions of late-capitalism as these affect the well-being of specialist, middle-class and public sector professionals. It explores how the organisation struggles to reconcile the flexibility and responsiveness characteristic of modern business with the unity and stability needed for a coherent image. Next, an examination of business survivor manuals addressing the needs of employees failing to cope with time-pressure and the required transformation into perfect new economy workers discovers their use of appealing narrative principles. The book covers the theoretical foundations on which assumptions about the subjectivity and identity of the professional middle class have been made, including the ideological pressures and contradictions. It also investigates satisfying work more fully through analysis of popular practical instruction books on cookery and horticulture. The book considers how organic activities involving slow time, such as horticulture, cookery and the craft of writing about them, give a strong cultural message concerning the current organisation of time, work satisfaction and relationships. In particular, it deals with how the human feels attuned to balance, continuity and interconnectedness through the cyclical patterns and regulated rhythms of slower evolutionary change evident in natural systems. The nature of the autobiographic text is also considered in the book.

Abstract only
Angela Lait

private sector. Corporate business and the public sector The signalling of a cultural shift towards the performance-driven, cost-effective market dynamism of corporate business has implications for the character and identity of public sector workforces and marks the end of public sector employment as a positive choice made to avoid the worst excesses of corporate business. For

in Telling tales
Towards a globalised notion of vampire identity
Aspasia Stephanou

serves the economic interests of corporate television. While it can be said that the US vampire community has tried to create a globalised notion of vampire identity that is less fictional and applies to all individuals from around the world, it has in fact facilitated the uniform spread of a Westernised version of the vampire. Apart from international vampire organisations located in the US, there are a

in Globalgothic
Abstract only
Angela Lait

slowness rejects reflexivity – the conditioned response – in favour of reflectivity – the considered response. Slowness is about mindful agency, conscious and deliberate action by agents who both are in control and take responsibility for their action – the ethical action that Kim Atkins holds is part of a human’s practical identity, i.e. one who must act in the world. What this means in

in Telling tales
Crossing boundaries and negotiating the cultural landscape
Author: Janice Norwood

Victorian touring actresses: Crossing boundaries and negotiating the cultural landscape provides a new perspective on the on- and offstage lives of women working in nineteenth-century theatre, and affirms the central role of touring, both within the United Kingdom and in North America and Australasia. Drawing on extensive archival research, it features a cross-section of neglected performers whose dramatic specialisms range from tragedy to burlesque. Although they were employed as stars in their own time, their contribution to the industry has largely been forgotten. The book’s innovative organisation follows a natural lifecycle, enabling a detailed examination of the practical challenges and opportunities typically encountered by the actress at each stage of her working life. Individual experiences are scrutinised to highlight the career implications of strategies adopted to cope with the demands of the profession, the physical potential of the actress’s body, and the operation of gendered power on and offstage. Analysis is situated in a wide contextual framework and reveals how reception and success depended on the performer’s response to the changing political, economic, social and cultural landscape as well as to developments in professional practice and organisation. The book concludes with discussion of the legacies of the performers, linking their experiences to the present-day situation.

Abstract only
Fast time and workplace identity
Angela Lait

recently the public sector, and through the attendant timeframes and social values within which we attempt to form and secure our identity. However, the fast turnover rates sustaining corporate capitalism through innovation and information exchange rest on instability, frequent structural changes and relocations (office moves, staffing reorganisation and downsizing layoffs), hot-desking, limited

in Telling tales
Abstract only
Angela Lait

that allows the objectivity necessary for evaluation. As such it is no surprise to find these forms, particularly autobiography, which is singularly fit for purpose, being used by middle-class authors to grapple with and settle questions of identity while at the same time providing a counter-narrative to the over-determining corporate-speak discussed in the previous chapter. In summary, current ideas of

in Telling tales
Clive Barker’s Halloween Horror Nights and brand authorship
Gareth James

. While processes of product differentiation and the management of brand identities between advertising agencies and manufacturers can be traced to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Celia Lury suggests that branding became an increasingly crucial cultural and economic process from the 1970s onwards. Forming part of the consolidation of global markets and corporate

in Clive Barker
Abstract only
Refiguring Dracula in a neoliberal age
Stéphanie Genz

marketise their identities (or self-brands) in the most productive and lucrative manner. While the opportunity of prosperity and entrepreneurship might have been viewed with optimism in the pre-recession decades, post-2008 neoliberalism’s market-driven logic appears less as an individual entitlement than a compassionless corporate contract that absolves debt-ridden governments from

in Neoliberal Gothic
Abstract only
Angela Lait

-expression, both of which are compromised by the pace and instantaneity of neoliberal productivity. Autobiography offers also a linguistically based means of healing the discourse-induced stress caused by corporate messages urging particular sanctioned identities that uphold economic growth in Western economies (see Chapter 1 ). It handles the process of selfmaking and the contradictions and resolutions facing

in Telling tales