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An emplaced approach

One of the core arguments of this book is that place matters and that identities, while dynamic and multi-dimensional, are at least partly rooted in place. In line with this argument, it is important to briefly outline the segregated nature of housing and education in Belfast and the likely impact of this on young people who grow up in interface areas. Providing a detailed

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Rethinking neutrality through constructivism

. This is largely Wendt’s domain, where he distinguishes between the state’s corporate identity (its internal human material and ideological characteristics) and its social identity (the meaning actors give to themselves whilst taking on the perspective of others). For some, this does not go far enough in explaining changes in nation-state identity and social structures (Reus

in The social construction of Swedish neutrality
Open Access (free)
Surveillance and transgender bodies in a post-9/ 11 era of neoliberalism

travel documents, or through corporate trans friendliness? As Max is beginning to embrace some form of early online identity, would Max rejoice at the fifty-plus options for gender identity, especially given the fact that Max found other forms of virtual reality and gaming so limiting? Would Max and the others see a ‘third gender’ as a positive development, or would they see it as a new form of state

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
Kosovo and the outlines of Europe’s new order

in the field. A remarkable uniformity of approach among different authors testifies not so much to the intellectual impotence of the trade as to a lack of reference-points in reconceptualising European security, compelling us to look back and attach our narratives to the Cold War as the last-known paradigm and a foolproof marker of Western identity. Old mental maps are still very much in use for charting the new waters

in Mapping European security after Kosovo

powerful influences in shaping the content of news media. With a twenty-four hour news cycle operating under stiff competition, media organizations push reporters to deliver stories within ever-tightening deadlines and budgets. Veteran reporters quickly learn to nurture friendly ties with government officials, corporate executives and community leaders. Good personal relations with potential sources help to

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
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leadership issues and internal corporate governance conflicts resulting from its structure as a membership agency which made for diverging interests of executive management and board members. In an environment characterized by limited resources, intense competition between American voluntary agencies was nearly inevitable. CARE was a particular trouble spot in the community, as the secular agency crossed into all fields of

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Sweden as an EU member state

LEGACY did much to redefine Swedish identity and neutrality and in light of Sweden’s bid to join the EU, can be regarded as an attempt to ‘normalise’ Sweden through the discourse of neoliberalism. Nonetheless, as Blyth noted previously, the post-Bildt era would not necessarily mean an easy return to traditional Social Democratic principles and ideology. When the SAP returned to power in 1994, it

in The social construction of Swedish neutrality
Bildt, Europe and neutrality in the post-Cold War era

neutral and non-neutral countries as to the purpose and relevance of neutrality. The chapter then moves on to discuss the Bildt coalition government of 1991–94. Under Bildt, Sweden’s shift towards Europeanism accelerated and his vision of locating Sweden away from exceptionalism towards ‘normality’ and a European identity underscored the important shifts emerging in Swedish politics, society and identity

in The social construction of Swedish neutrality

? My hypothesis is that it was because the Serbs were willing – unlike the other nations of Yugoslavia – to continue the identity of Yugoslavia and its unifying Socialist Party. Thence, the others could be seen as legitimate liberation movements fighting against the corrupted evil-doers, namely the Serbs still inclined to bad socialism. 25 Of course, as Peter Viggo Jakobsen has pointed out

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
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responsibility for these damaging air strikes lay in the mouths of the leaders that authorized them. Image 6.1 ‘Bush and Olmert air raid’ by Carlos Latuff When the identities in cartoons are not embodied in individual

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict