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Ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies

cultural practitioners has tended to foreground questions of race and ethnicity, it has been almost axiomatic in cultural studies simply to overlook the particular immigrant background of the second-generation Irish, who Norquay_08_Ch7 117 22/3/02, 10:01 am 118 Cultural negotiations have instead been subsumed in an all-encompassing, and largely undefined, ‘white ethnicity’. Moreover, in a great deal of work on questions of race, ethnicity and popular music, second-generation Irish musicians have been recruited for a putative Anglo-Saxon ‘centre’ against which the

in Across the margins
The scholarly achievements of Sir James Ware

different ethnic and cultural backgrounds, which might in other circumstances prove to be insuperable obstacles to friendship and trust, it is clear that these could be overcome by their mutual devotion to the course of preserving Ireland’s rich medieval heritage. Whatever might be said about the divisive nature of Irish society in the seventeenth century, Ware’s extensive network suggests that such divisions were by no means impermeable. The passion Ware demonstrated in his scholarly endeavours interlinks with the second important observation about his book

in Dublin

11 Critical overview and conclusion Timothy Brennan in his critical study Salman Rushdie and the Third World identifies Rushdie as being a member of a distinctive and historically original group of writers that has come to prominence in the period following the formal dissolution of the British Empire. These writers are described by Brennan as Third World cosmopolitans: migrant intellectuals who are identified with a Western metropolitan elite in terms of class, literary preferences and educational background, but who, by virtue of ethnicity, are also presented

in Salman Rushdie
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’s cultural background. Moreover, hyper-masculinity replaces ethnic identification with equally narrow gendered identity stereotypes. So while, for Gilroy, planetary humanism means transcendence not just of race but also gender, for Malkani’s young men shifting away from racial identification is simply in the name of alternative prejudices.13 Consumed by the need to be ‘real men’ Hardjit and his friends – in positions of ethnic dominance – aggressively form themselves not in reaction to white racism, which might have a certain tragic justification, but rather simply to

in British Asian fiction
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essential to understanding the concept developed through this book, that British Asian writers offer a particular sensibility. Despite his resistance to such readings, Kureisi’s work is undoubtedly informed by his personal experiences of racial politics in Britain. His texts offer perspectives on identity which, even when not explicitly about ethnicity, are framed nevertheless by a unique positioning. Kureishi’s posed-ethnicity is also undoubtedly foregrounded by his own mixed-race background – born to an English mother and a Pakistani father – a physical symbol of the

in British Asian fiction

postcolonial 178 After ’89 performance history that engages with multiethnic perspectives through casting have resulted in the arrogation of racial critique exclusively to white bodies in a mode that invalidates that critique and redoubles the exceptionalism of whiteness as the founding basis of representation that relegates other racial and ethnic subjectivities to the background. In Desert and Wilderness Weronika Szczawińska’s W pustyni i w puszczy z Sienkiewicza i innych was directed by Bartosz Frąckowiak at the Teatr Dramatyczny in Wałbrzych in 2011. In preparation

in After ’89
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Zadie Smith’s White Teeth (2000) or Marion Molteno’s ‘In Her Mother’s House’ (1987), which are not written by authors of BritishAsian ethnicity, but nevertheless address issues related to this cultural background.54 The book is structured to trace a chronology, though not necessarily a linear development. Chapter 1 explores the transition between migrant and British-born/ raised positioning through the figures of V. S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie, arguing that the common reading of their liminal positioning can be reconsidered to emphasise the transition from migrant

in British Asian fiction
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exploit the possibilities of recreating Western romance narratives with a British Asian twist. In this, they draw upon an already established Indian romance market. Romances such as the popular US imprint Harlequin and its British equivalent Mills and Boon are imported in large numbers to the developing world, in particular to India, where they are read in English by middle-class Asian women. There has been little research on how the consumption of such Western fictions impacts upon the attitudes of women readers from other ethnic backgrounds in terms of their own

in British Asian fiction
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not think immigrants opened the country up to new cultures, only 12 per cent of Scots agreed.8 Various reasons are used to explain this difference, from the rather positive reading of Scots as ‘an essentially welcoming, tolerant people’,9 to the more negative sense in which prejudice in Scotland is directed not towards ethnic minorities, but rather towards an alternative ‘other’: the English.10 The small number of ethnic minorities in Scotland (2 per cent in 2001),11 and their concentration in its four major cities, is very different to the British situation.12 Yet

in British Asian fiction
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The immigrant in contemporary Irish literature

these chapters. What binds all these literary voices together is the recognition of the co-presence in Ireland of people from different ethnonational backgrounds. As Ben Pitcher claims in The Politics of Multiculturalism, acknowledging the ‘facticity of difference’ is the starting point for any examination of ‘an already existing socio-political reality of which cultural difference has become a defining feature’ (2009: 2). Pitcher continues, the existence of cultural difference – whether understood in terms of race, ethnicity or religion – has become fully

in Literary visions of multicultural Ireland