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Ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies

cultural practitioners has tended to foreground questions of race and ethnicity, it has been almost axiomatic in cultural studies simply to overlook the particular immigrant background of the second-generation Irish, who Norquay_08_Ch7 117 22/3/02, 10:01 am 118 Cultural negotiations have instead been subsumed in an all-encompassing, and largely undefined, ‘white ethnicity’. Moreover, in a great deal of work on questions of race, ethnicity and popular music, second-generation Irish musicians have been recruited for a putative Anglo-Saxon ‘centre’ against which the

in Across the margins
Faïza Guène, Saphia Azzeddine, and Nadia Bouzid, or the birth of a new Maghrebi-French women’s literature

-familial and ethnic background of the different characters, allowing the readers to learn more about the disenfranchised community each time the characters are summoned to explain themselves, each new testimony adding complexity to their identity. From a narrative perspective, Guène demonstrates that any event, tragic or not, cannot be narrated in an identical manner. Indeed, within the little town, the sociocultural parameters that frame each character’s life preclude one single way of telling a story.7 The polyphony illustrated by Les gens du Balto is an undisguised

in Reimagining North African Immigration
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The immigrant in contemporary Irish literature

these chapters. What binds all these literary voices together is the recognition of the co-presence in Ireland of people from different ethnonational backgrounds. As Ben Pitcher claims in The Politics of Multiculturalism, acknowledging the ‘facticity of difference’ is the starting point for any examination of ‘an already existing socio-political reality of which cultural difference has become a defining feature’ (2009: 2). Pitcher continues, the existence of cultural difference – whether understood in terms of race, ethnicity or religion – has become fully

in Literary visions of multicultural Ireland

’s maternal inheritance – one romantic and poetic, the other dour and Presbyterian – battling for attention in the two (semi-fictionalised) accounts of his Irish grandparents. Nevertheless, Steinbeck’s assertion of a ‘Celtic’ background does extend this dichotomy to near-implausible extremes. If, though, we regard Steinbeck’s ‘Celtic’ assertions as largely cultural and his ‘Ulster’ claims as largely ethnic, we can begin to unravel some of the complexities surrounding his affiliations and disaffiliations with Ireland. In the letters cited above, Steinbeck associates the

in American literature and Irish culture, 1910–55

access to art making for both Irish-born and immigrant members of Irish society, regardless of race, ethnicity or class. The origins of Irish community arts can be traced to the late 1970s (Fitzgerald, 2004: 1). This diverse area of practice, including theatre, music, dance, circus, street performance, and multidisciplinary fine and visual arts projects emerged out of the most violent period of the Troubles and a background of poverty, drug use, and social exclusion on the island of Ireland as a whole. The socially engaged field of community arts is a vital precursor

in Literary visions of multicultural Ireland
The immigrant in contemporary Irish poetry

, Palmerstown Traffic-Lights’, for instance, O’Donnell depicts a crippled girl from Eastern Europe delivering newspapers among ‘snoozing cars’. This character becomes the starting point for the speaker to reflect on how ‘[h]ere [in Ireland], she is at war with deficit’ (150). Her disadvantaged citizenship is strengthened not only by her physical, handicapped condition, but also by virtue of her economic class and ethnic background. O’Donnell denounces the unwillingness of Irish society to address such inequities. The sleepiness of Irish drivers recalls their utter

in Literary visions of multicultural Ireland
The poetry of Sinéad Morrissey, Leontia Flynn, Mary O’Malley, and Michael Hayes

when one man mentioned the ‘Warrior’. (Ibid.) The final poem from ‘Survivor’, entitled ‘Inlets’, evokes a point that tends to be forgotten these days, namely that ‘people from all sorts of ethnic and cultural backgrounds have called Ireland ‘home’ and have been doing it throughout Irish history’ and that these people ‘made immeasurable contributions to Ireland’s culture and prosperity’ (Richardson, 2005): Three inlets Related all, The stories they’d tell if only they could talk! First came the Stone people Then the Bronze Vikings and Normans Jews, Gentile and Moor

in Literary visions of multicultural Ireland
Transcending the question of origins

, these films expose the social, psychological, and cultural obstacles that can stand in the way of those who dream of integration into French society; and they demonstrate – with a lucidity all the more acute for being laced with humour – the ragged systemic flaws that lie not far below the surface of social life in France today’ (2007: 308). Marivaux’s theater gives L’Esquive its political dimension and calls for a fresh view on young people living in rundown housing projects. The cultural and ethnic backgrounds of the protagonists are not revealed explicitly, as the

in Reimagining North African Immigration
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'Why do we like being Irish?'

their maternal Irish backgrounds as a means of giving them a ‘discourse’, which might mediate between their individual voices and their inherited influences as they were embarking on their literary careers. In Steinbeck’s early work To a God Unknown (1935) the desire to complete the work of the fictional father saturates every page – but more telling is the starring role of Steinbeck’s Irish grandfather in East of Eden (1952). Conversely, Fitzgerald’s semiautobiographical novel This Side of Paradise (1920) is weighed down by the constant absence of a father

in American literature and Irish culture, 1910–55
Intercultural exchanges and the redefinition of identity in Hugo Hamilton’s Disguise and Hand in the Fire

how the national ‘great narrative of dispossession and belonging’ could be transformed ‘with a certain amount of historic irony [into] one of the treasures of [Irish] society’, from which the Irish people could learn ‘values of diversity, tolerance and fair-mindedness’ (Robinson, 1995). As Richard Kearney notes, Robinson’s definition of the Irish nation came under the rubric of the ‘migrant nation’, where ‘the nation remains partially ethnic, but is enlarged to embrace all those emigrants and exiles who live beyond the territory of the nation-state per se’ (original

in Literary visions of multicultural Ireland