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spirit-lifting ‘cheer-up’ song ‘Be Like the Kettle and Sing’, until the all-clear sounds. Struggling composer Frank Foster gets her to record privately his latest song ‘After the Rain’. Bandleader Geraldo, playing himself, gets Peggy an introduction to BBC executive Hastropp and she delivers a copy of the record to his office. It is forgotten until accidentally played when a programme is under-running. Peggy becomes an instant star and Geraldo plays the song with

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60

cinemas, initially on the edges and latterly in the centre of Britain’s towns and cities, was the result of changes in economic, political and cultural policies precipitated by both the apparent triumph of laissez-faire capitalism and the hegemony of the Hollywood film. Moreover, the design of the multiplex and its place within a shifting consumer landscape saw the development of larger and grander buildings often located close

in From silent screen to multi-screen

about their daily lives, a recurrent visual trope which stresses the relationship between the wireless and its listeners. The narrator explains that the BBC belongs to the people who pay their ten shillings a year licence fee. 700 people work in the 350 offices. The post is delivered, 2,000 letters a day, and we hear a montage of voices praising, blaming, complaining, enquiring; and a series of extracts from replies. At an executive planning meeting, the

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60

was in many ways a political move intended to pacify middle-class pressure groups, local authorities and central government which, it was feared in the case of the latter, would impose state censorship. Much of the agitation for greater censorship and regulation of the cinema came from a plethora of moral and religious pressure groups, drawing their constituents largely from amongst the middle and upper classes, such as the

in From silent screen to multi-screen
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, Clark Gable, Edward G. Robinson and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. But it was a major problem getting Hollywood stars to travel to New York for a one-off radio show and in 1935 the ratings began to slip. Danny Danker, a Thompson executive, suggested a drastic solution – moving the entire show to Hollywood and adapting current movie successes with top stars. So in 1936 production of the show moved to Hollywood and it was recorded live in the Music Box Theatre on Hollywood

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60

understanding that they had to include at least one Disney cartoon in each show. 10 In 1938 Richard Ford, an Odeon executive with responsibility for the clubs, instigated a questionnaire for cinema managers intended to collect information on the members of the clubs (which totalled approximately 150,000 children). Ford estimated that in 1939 approximately 4.6 million children were visiting the cinema every week. 11 Upon his

in From silent screen to multi-screen

production executive who wants a tiger sequence, though there are no tigers in Africa; a snooty leading lady who keeps fainting and the Lion Man himself, Stanley Obroski, a world champion marathon runner (‘He don’t have to act but he looks great stripped’), who turns out to be a coward and eventually dies of fever. The story ends with Lord Greystoke in Hollywood auditioning for the role of Tarzan in a film to be produced by Prominent Pictures. He is turned down: ‘Not

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60

a career as an oil executive, a job he came to hate and from which he was sacked in 1932, taking up writing as a means of earning a living. Chandler identified precisely the ways in which Hammett had changed detective fiction. Writing in The Simple Art of Murder , he said: Hammett took murder out of the Venetian vase and dropped it in the alley … Hammett wrote for people with a sharp, aggressive attitude to life. They were not afraid of the seamy side of

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60

-female staff, for the theatre already possesses the first doorwoman.86 Although it would be inaccurate to suggest that the Second World War was the first time that women entered technical or executive positions in the British cinema exhibition sector, there was a notable increase in the number of female managers and projectionists (sometimes dubbed ‘projectionettes’, ‘operettes’ or ‘projectionistes’) between 1939 and 1945. Of course, women had played an integral role in the cinema industry since its earliest days, and David R. Williams has observed that female operators had

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45