Abstract only

. Martel , In the Closet of the Vatican: Power, Homosexuality, Hypocrisy ( London , 2019 ). 13 M. Keenan , Child Sexual Abuse and the Catholic Church: Gender, Power and Organizational Culture ( Oxford , 2012 ), pp. 24 – 53 , 154 – 229 . 14

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encouraged more of a focus on some issues, and less on others. For example, the lack of consideration of homosexuality, or the significance of race, is a consequence of the design and sample of the oral history research. 5 In reference to the Mass Observation Project (MOP), Annebella Pollen has argued that

in The Pope and the pill

specific rules of sexual morality, such as an opposition to things like polygamy, homosexuality and the separation of sex and procreation (these ideas predated the emergence of organised Christianity, Foucault tells us), but introduced instead certain procedures of self-regulation for inculcating these moral codes. He describes these mechanisms as ‘technologies of the self’; processes such as internalisation, alerting

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married to his own wife, are by virtue of the marriage sacrament each married to the other husband. Wyclif draws upon the proper vows and procedures underlying a successful marital conjunction to answer this objection, as well as appealing to the gender of the marital partners (since homosexual marriages were impossible in fourteenth-century England). The second objection relates to marital partnerships in which no childbirth takes place, which Wyclif answers initially by declaring that people who are unable to procreate are married unlawfully. He then goes on to offer

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