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masculinities within a British context of local and global change. Different generations of Irish men going to Britain include those of the Famine, the post-Second World War, the 1980s ‘Ryanair’ migrants and the current post-Celtic Tiger, transnational generation of Skype/Facebook users.2 The second section explores changing self-representations, social practices and cultural journeys among Irish men. We draw upon narratives of different generations that we have collected across different cities that include stories about workplace identities, friendship, cultural belonging

in Are the Irish different?

relationship to identity construction, many cultural commentators share a number of theoretical assumptions regarding the body, gender and sexuality post-AIDS. This commonality concerns an assumption that the visual field, particularly vis-à-vis eroticised images of safer sex, works to break down and/or transgress a stable heterosexual masculine identity, to the extent that for many social and cultural theorists such images have been assumed to incite a crisis of the male body and a crisis of heterosexual masculinity. In making this assumption explicit this chapter aims to

in Object matters

tradition, resistance, victimhood, and masculinity. Northern soul: the Scots as ersatz ancestors As we have seen, European heritage enthusiasts can face several problems when attempting to rediscover and celebrate their own past. It may be that their history and traditions are either lost, unknown, not taught at school, or that they seem boring, lacking the songs, legends, and costumes which would make their celebration exciting. Many Scots of Europe have tried to embrace their more obvious roots but were disappointed: The problem with Dutch old music is that it is a

in Warrior dreams
Open Access (free)

In my search for tidy conclusions and a singular confirmation of the meaning of sport in the Black Atlantic, I came up empty handed, or “wit’ me two long arms” as cricket club members might say. There are so many dimensions to the transnational flows of peoples and cultures of the Afro-Caribbean diaspora that have important bearing on how we think about black masculinities

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Minds, machines, and monsters

A chess-player is not simply one who plays chess just as a chess piece is not simply a wooden block. Shaped by expectations and imaginations, the figure occupies the centre of a web of a thousand radiations where logic meets dream, and reason meets play. This book aspires to a novel reading of the figure as both a flickering beacon of reason and a sign of monstrosity. It is underpinned by the idea that the chess-player is a pluralistic subject used to articulate a number of anxieties pertaining to themes of mind, machine, and monster. The history of the cultural chess-player is a spectacle, a collision of tradition and recycling, which rejects the idea of the statuesque chess-player. The book considers three lives of the chess-player. The first as sinner (concerning behavioural and locational contexts), as a melancholic (concerning mind-bending and affective contexts), and as animal (concerning cognitive aspects and the idea of human-ness) from the medieval to the early-modern within non-fiction. The book then considers the role of the chess-player in detective fiction from Edgar Allan Poe to Raymond Chandler, contrasting the perceived relative intellectual reputation and social utility of the chess-player and the literary detective. IBM's late-twentieth-century supercomputer Deep Blue, Wolfgang von Kempelen's 1769 Automaton Chess-Player and Garry Kasparov's 1997 defeat are then examined. The book examines portrayals of the chess-player within comic-books of the mid-twentieth century, considering themes of monstrous bodies, masculinities, and moralities. It focuses on the concepts of the child prodigy, superhero, and transhuman.

Open Access (free)

-Caribbean community, to celebrate blackness and masculinity, and to establish themselves as part of a local community. I delve into their activities before, during and after games that mark them as part of a bounded group. Liming : creating Afro-Caribbean social spaces and networks For many of the Mavericks, playing cricket in Canada meant playing in cold weather for the first time

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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The challenge of Dónal Óg Cusack’s ‘coming out’ to heteronormativity in contemporary Irish culture and society

mainstream Irish media responded to and dealt with the topic. Of particular interest is how Cusack’s sexuality was framed in the context of his sportsmanship, his masculinity and his Irishness. For example, we ask whether the ostensible incongruousness of homosexuality and male team sportsmanship was foregrounded in the coverage and whether Cusack’s sexuality was perceived as a threat to or compatible with received understandings of Irish manhood. Finally, we consider what the visibility of an openly gay GAA player might mean for LGBT sports people in Ireland. While

in Defining events
Abstract only

he had to leave: ‘They all stood around me,’ he told his mother. ‘I had no choice but to sign the release papers.’ She recounted: He came home and he sat there and he broke down. He was down and out for months, probably a year or two with that. And this [cosmetic surgery] operation was meant to be an end and a beginning, to end everything, to get his body the way he wanted it to be. One way of framing this bullying and Leigh’s subsequent actions is to deploy Raewyn Connell’s ([1987] 2005) concept of hegemonic masculinity. She explains how the most idealised and

in Beautyscapes

the way the practice of unsafe heterosex – without a condom – is a normative gendered act. Moreover, it is widely argued that the practice of unsafe heterosex embodies and is constitutive of hegemonic heterosexual masculinity. This view is summed up by Segal (1990: 165): many heterosexual men . . . refuse to wear condoms . . . Men’s need to prove their masculinity – their difference from women and from ‘poofters’ – through a compulsive heterosexuality . . . is in the context of AIDS, even more dangerous for women than it ever was before. The condom, gender and

in Object matters

, [and] ultimately corrupting’ adds several excellent further recommendations for their study.5 A fully constructed cultural perspective of the chess-player, as our earlier forays into detective fiction, science fiction, and other marginal literary forms have demonstrated, must recognise that even the most unpromising of texts may reveal valuable insight. The comic-books chosen for discussion here include stories involving well-known figures as well as less familiar texts. Otherness In opposition to mid-twentieth-century American norms of masculinity and domestic life

in A cultural history of chess-players