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Adaptive symbiosis and Peake’s Presumption, or the fate of Frankenstein

fear is played for laughs; he is cast as the rustic rube: ‘Why couldn’t you be happy in your native village … instead of coming here to the city?’ (I, i). Interestingly, that clownish anxiety pushes on a broader cultural anxiety surrounding emerging issues of modernity, namely, industrialisation and the huge population migration away from the English countryside and into the city. William Wordsworth’s ‘Preface to the Lyrical Ballads’ (1800 edition), the poet’s unofficial manifesto of Romanticism, touches directly on this anxiety. The Preface

in Adapting Frankenstein
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Neoliberal gothic

the dark past. And in the last five years, the transnational zombie horde has become ubiquitous. 1 This collection of essays engages with the geopolitical context of the gothic’s migration from the periphery to the fast-beating heart of popular culture – specifically the rise to economic and cultural predominance of global neoliberalism. It is no coincidence, we contend, that the characters and plots of

in Neoliberal Gothic
Locating the globalgothic

about depictions of the liminal spaces that blur the boundaries between the local and the global, here and there, nation and migration. A strand of the globalgothic, then, appears in the dissolution of clear-cut jurisdictions where the law might provide order to chaos. And another related strand might arise out of the socially induced traumas that haunt the deferral of borders. In both cases globalgothic texts are

in Globalgothic
Open Access (free)

have been largely ignored by literary criticism. Like Roche, then, Cuthbertson represents the migration of Irish literary production at the start of the nineteenth century and is indicative of the systematic erasure of so much popular fiction from the annals of (Irish) Romantic literature. The relegation of gothic romance writers such as Roche, Cuthbertson, and many of the other authors included in this study to the margins of literary history not only denies the significance of their long-lasting, transnational appeal, but it also emphasises the limitations of

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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From White Zombie to World War Z

with questions of empire, cultural transition, nation and migration, a novel that may or may not be postcolonial, magical realist or, even, gothic: Salman Rushdie’s Shame ( 1983 ). Shame tells the story of Indian independence and partition, focusing on the political ramifications and hard realities of military and religious power in a newly formed Pakistan. But that is one of its storylines. It also spins a fabulous

in Globalgothic

multidirectional traffic exposes the limitation to ideas of Western cultural hegemony in the face of competing and globally dispersed patterns of consumption. Here, always mobile, travelling with migrations and through the flows of global media, boundaries between life and death, real and unreal, self and other, normality and deviance become defamiliarised as they are shifted across geographical, virtual and

in Globalgothic
Open Access (free)
Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction

, ultimately proves disastrous for him, it serves several important purposes. First, it highlights the wholesale migration of Irish print culture in this period. Second, it emphasises the precariousness of London literary life for Irish émigré authors like Roche herself. Third, it points to the acute awareness Roche shared with many of her contemporaries of her participation in what Karen O’Brien calls ‘a borderless and mobile European and transatlantic culture of fiction’ that enabled and encouraged cultural transfer and an ongoing reconfiguration of Irishness during the

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Capitalising (on) ghosts in German postdramatic theatre

theatrical practices and their formal results that give rise to the form in the first instance. Postdramatic spectres and undead figurations are more than simply self-reflexive metaphors for complex formal experiments and citational practices; their real importance derives from their links to extra-theatrical discourses such as neoliberal economics, labour relations and migration. I

in Neoliberal Gothic
Surreal Englishness and postimperial Gothic in The Bojeffries Saga

context, the British Nationality Act of 1981 marks an explicit attempt to define Englishness in a racially exclusionary manner, particularly when faced with migrations from the postcolonial margins. The Act was part of a transitional process that included the Immigration Acts of 1962, 1968 and 1971 that fundamentally reorganised the relationship between England and the Commonwealth

in Alan Moore and the Gothic Tradition
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). Noting how Soucouyant draws upon and yet differs from Caribbean works that represent spectrality and possession ‘without invoking the language of monstrosity or terror’ (51), Edwards examines the ways in which the soucouyant is reframed in order to articulate a sense of fractured identity. Edwards considers globalgothic in terms of the migrations or displacements that engender social dislocations

in Globalgothic