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Christian Kaunert and Dr Sarah Leonard

This chapter will analyse the external dimension of asylum and migration. The external dimension of asylum and migration represents an increasingly important element of EU policy activity, and is clearly embedded in one of the most interesting and important policy areas, which a large number of scholars have been debating (Joppke, 1998, 2001; Freeman, 1998; Guiraudon, 2000, 2001

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Sharon Weinblum

: Netherland Geographical Studies. Hartman, B., 2011. ‘Yishai: Every African ‘Infiltrator’ will Return Home’. Jerusalem Post . Available at www.jpost.com/National-News/Yishai-Every-African-infiltrator-will-return-home (accessed 5 September 2015). Huysmans, J., 2000. ‘The European Union and the Securitization of Migration’, Journal of Common Market Studies 38(5): 751

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Christian Kaunert

, 2003 ; Occhipinti, 2003), crucially, there is no book that addresses the entire Area of Freedom, Security and Justice). Furthermore, the existing literature on policies that we might classify as components of the AFSJ discusses them in isolation from one another. There are some excellent individual studies of asylum, migration and police cooperation (Joppke, 1998, 2001; Freeman, 1998

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Christian Kaunert

This chapter investigates the potential second step in the construction of an Area of Freedom, Security and Justice. The first major security threat has been terrorism as analysed in the two preceding chapters. However, more quietly, asylum and migration has also become to be seen as a significant security threat which has supposedly influenced the first phase of the Common

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European internal security

Towards supranational governance in the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice

Series:

Christian Kaunert

The European Commission had become one of the more contentious actors during both Irish referenda on the Lisbon Treaty. This book discusses the role of the European Commission and institutions more generally, as well as the policy area of justice and home affairs. It argues that it is important to evaluate the role of EU institutions for the process of European integration. The book suggests a reconceptualisation of the framework of supranational policy entrepreneurs (SPEs), which is often referred to by the academic literature that discusses the role of agency in European integration. It focuses on the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice (AFSJ) at the policy and treaty levels; primarily on four grounds: academic literature, SPE behaviour, EU's policymaking, and the interplay between treaty negotiations and policy-making. To analyse the role of the European institutions, the book combines an analysis of the Lisbon Treaty in relation to the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice with an analysis of the policy-making in the same area. The public policy model by John Kingdon with constructivist international relations literature is also outlined. The external dimension of counter-terrorism in the EU; the role of the EU institutions in EU asylum and migration; and the role of he Common European Asylum System (CEAS) is discussed. The book also analyses the role of the EU institutions in the communitarisation of the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice, in the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, and thus subsequently in the Lisbon Treaty.

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Migrants, medics, matrons

Exploring the spectrum of Irish immigrants in the wartime British health sector

Jennifer Redmond

, migration history has been dominated by narratives of unskilled workers. Granted, unskilled work was the majority experience for Irish migrants over the last two centuries: domestic service for women, navvying or unskilled labouring for men. Even in the immediate post-war period Irish-born men in unskilled work outnumbered those in professional and technical professions by three to

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‘Illegals’ in the Law School of Athens

Public presence, discourse, and migrants as threat

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Giannis Gkolfinopoulos

Greece as a major problem for the nation. The material I examine in this chapter focuses mostly on the conservative and centre-left newspapers that represent the core of the mainstream press in Greece. The Law School crisis resonated with the general problem of illegal migration in Greece. By representing the public presence of migrants in the Law School of Athens as a serious problem, the press

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Unpacking the new mobilities paradigm

Lessons for critical security studies?

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Emmanuel-Pierre Guittet

of this, I take a step back and reflect more broadly on the intersections, actual and potential, between the literatures on mobilities and critical security studies. The ‘new mobilities paradigm’ emerged across different disciplines from sociology to geography, anthropology to business studies, migration and tourism to urban studies. 1 Mobility may be undoubtedly fashionable but evaluating its

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Introduction

Security/ Mobility and politics of movement

Series:

Marie Beauchamps, Marijn Hoijtink, Matthias Leese, Bruno Magalhães and Sharon Weinblum

about organized crime, global terrorism, undocumented migration and other dangerous mobilities’ (Walters 2006 : 199) that render movement a central political concern. While contemporary liberal politics actively encourages and enables mobility for the sake of our modern lifestyle and the economic benefits that it yields, it also seeks to render the flows of such mobility knowledgeable and controllable

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From denationalizing history to decanonizing teaching history

A programme for the teaching of history in the post- national era

Series:

Thomas Adam

and online lectures. The internationalization and transnationalization of teaching history is another keyword for the reconstruction of history in the pursuit of endowing history education with new relevance in an increasingly globalized world. If history is to be relevant to students’ life in the twenty-first century, it needs to relate to their experience and problems. And challenges from migration to terrorism are global in nature and cannot be explained by referencing a national framework. There are many ways to achieve a state of history