Search results

Abstract only
Amsterdam 1617

Migration hub The intense migration into seventeenth-century Amsterdam is well known (Janssen 2017 ; Bredero 2017 : 64–6). 1 At the same time the city became the focus for the accelerated commercial activity that defined the Dutch Republic (properly the Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Provinciën , or Republic of the

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre

Michael MacCarthy-Morrogh, The Munster Plantation: English Migration to Southern Ireland, 1583–1641 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986), pp. 55–6. 9 The genealogical connection is reported in George Lillie Craik, Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser (1845), 251, but this Sarah Spenser is described as the grandmother of Walter Travers and so is

in The early Spenser, 1554–80

This volume considers transnational and intercultural aspects of early modern theatre, drama and performance. Its twelve chapters, loosely cosmographically grouped into West, North and South, compose a complex image of early modern theatre connections as a socially, economically, politically and culturally realised tissue of links, networks, influences and paths of exchange. With particular attention to itinerant performers, court festival, and the significant black, Muslim and Jewish impact, they combine disciplines and methods to place Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the wider context of early performance culture in English, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Czech and Italian speaking Europe. Their shared methodological approach examines transnational connections by linking abstract notions of wider theatre historical significance to concrete historical facts: archaeological findings, archival records, visual artefacts, and textual evidence. Crucial to the volume is this systematic yoking of theories with surviving historical evidence for the performative event – whether as material object, text, performative routine, theatregrams, rituals, festivities, genres, archival evidence or visual documentation. This approach enables it to explore the infinite variety of early modern performance culture by expanding the discourse, questioning the received canon, and rethinking the national restrictions of conventional maps to reveal a theatre that truly is without borders.

Abstract only

the unmanageable northern lordships and the threat of Scottish migration. The best known of these ventures was that undertaken by Smith himself on the strategic Ards peninsula. Seen as a base from which to spread English control up the Antrim coast, this colony, to have a capital city named ‘Elizabetha’, was funded by public subscription. Here, too, such efforts were seen to threaten the existing (dis)order. The authorities in Dublin did little to help the fledgling settlement (probably a defended village), and in 1575 it was destroyed in an attack following the

in Castles and Colonists
Abstract only

stereotyping as well as nuancing the Germans and the English. Migration, hybridity, and cosmopolitanism are the overwhelming facts of the early modern Amsterdam explored by Nigel Smith in this volume, but we shouldn’t romanticise this. Gerbrand Adriaenszoon Bredero (1585–1618), the Dutch playwright explored by Smith in Chapter 5, paradoxically defends vernacular linguistic purity

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre

appeared for the new colonial settlements. A proposal made in 1585 for Munster contained a scheme to establish hundreds to replicate the judicial and taxing divisions of an English county/shire, each of which would contain nearly 1000 families. 28 In what must have been a great disappointment to the grantees, migration to Munster may have reached only one-tenth that amount. 29 The tracts of escheated Desmond lands were widely scattered, and the native population refused to assist the surveying of the expropriated lands. And where holdings were established, the new

in Castles and Colonists
Abstract only

contexts of the early modern period. See The Self Made Map: Cartographic Writing in Early Modern France (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996), p. xi. See also Fabienne L. Michelet, Creation, Migration, and Conquest: Imaginary Geography and Sense of Space in Old English Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006), p. 8 and pp. 19–21 for a discussion of historical terms and vocabularies. 79 J.H. Andrews, Shapes of Ireland: Maps and their Makers 1564–1839 (Dublin: Geography Publications, 1997), p. 31.

in Edmund Spenser and the romance of space
Macbeth’s national identity in the eighteenth century

anything the ‘Gaelic Revival’ confirmed Scottophobic fears that Northerners were intent on cultural imperialism as well as economic migration. Given that the eighteenth century was notable for both Shakespeare’s cultural elevation and for outbreaks of Anglo-Scottish hostility, Macbeth ’s theatrical presentation in the period is of particular interest. Was the play’s location

in Shakespeare and Scotland

, Frederick Morgan Padelford and Ray Heffner, 11 vols (Baltimore, 1932–45), vol. x, pp. 47–8, 53. 25 Henry Horwitz, Chancery equity records, 1600–1800: A guide to documents in the Public Record Office (London: HMSO, 1995), pp. 45–71. I am grateful to Simon Healy for explaining many of the complexities of Chancery courts to me. 26 Anthony J. Sheehan, ‘Provincial grievance and national revolt: Munster in the Nine Years War’ (unpublished MA thesis, University College, Dublin, 1982), p. 16; Michael McCarthy-Morrogh, The Munster plantation: English migration to southern

in Dublin
Abstract only
Writing for the stage in Restoration Dublin

the atmosphere of the city in the early 1660s; it is depicted as a kind of frontier town awash with chancers and bankrupts recently arrived from London in flight from their creditors, living on their wits and in search of an easy living in a land of opportunity, albeit one that they find disappointing and unattractive. Social fragmentation, partly caused by large-scale migration, was a feature of seventeenth-century Ireland.38 In Act I, Scene 1, well-known Dublin inns are mentioned – The Plume of Feathers on Castle Street and The London Tavern on Fishamble Street

in Dublin