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Refugee women in Britain and France
Gill Allwood and Khursheed Wadia

Allwood 02 24/2/10 2 10:27 Page 49 Migration contexts, demographic and social characteristics: refugee women in Britain and France This chapter introduces the reader to the landscape of international migration within which female refugee migrants are positioned. Its aim is twofold. First, it gives an overview of inward migration flows into Britain and France while bearing in mind both the general European context and processes of feminisation which have occurred over the last 50 years. Second, it presents, as fully as available data allows, the demographic

in Refugee women in Britain and France
David Rieff

. If humanitarian certainties have been upended, it is not in Sri Lanka, or even Syria or Afghanistan, but in the NGO response to the migration crisis in Greece and in the Mediterranean. For here, whether they like it or not, when they rescue people at sea who are trying to get to Europe, relief NGOs are involved not just in caritative work, whose deontology is relatively straightforward ethically; here, they are important actors in a profound political struggle, whose outcome, along with the response or non-response to climate change, is likely to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rescaling migration, citizenship, and rights

Recent debates over migration, refuge, and citizenship are challenging the assumed primacy of the nation-state as the key guarantor of rights and entitlements. Sanctuary Cities and Urban Struggles makes the first sustained intervention into exploring how such considerations of citizenship, rights, and mobility are recast when examined from different spatial scales. The collection brings together discussions from across political geography, urban geography, citizenship studies, socio-legal studies, and refugee studies to explore the role of urban social movements, localised practices of belonging and rights claiming, and diverse articulations of sanctuary in reshaping where and how responses to the governance of migration are articulated. Working from the intimate relations of the body and interpersonal accounts of sanctuary, through to strategies for autonomous settlement as part of Europe’s ‘summer of migration’, the collection sets out to challenge the often assumed primacy of the nation-state as the dominant lens through which to understand questions of citizenship and mobility. In its place, Sanctuary Cities and Urban Struggles proposes not a singular alternative, but rather a set of interlocking sites and scales of political practice and imagination, all of which respond to, and variously rework, the governmental demands of the contemporary nation-state. Mixing empirical cases and conceptualisations that move beyond ‘seeing like a state’, this collection will be of interest to geographers, political sociologists, migration scholars, social anthropologists, and urbanists.

German Responses to the June 2019 Mission of the Sea-Watch 3
Klaus Neumann

-named Triton, which, however, did not result in a decrease of drownings in the Mediterranean. Privately funded NGOs have carried out SAR missions in the Mediterranean since August 2014, when Migration Offshore Aid Station (MOAS), which was founded and largely funded by Maltese-based entrepreneurs Christopher and Regina Catrambone, commenced SAR operations with its rescue vessel M/Y Phoenix . MOAS was soon joined by established humanitarian organisations such as Save the Children and NGOs specifically set up to carry out SAR missions. Their approaches varied, with MOAS and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse
Juliano Fiori

people access to information – facts – on the situation in the Mediterranean, so that they at least are able to form their own judgement on it. They can then decide whether they have a responsibility. Definitely the need is there. After eleven years with MSF, it was really this kind of political and social engagement that interested me. SOS is a ‘hydroponic NGO’, if I may put it like that – nourished from below. Working with the organisation in Switzerland is particularly interesting, given that the country is not very open-minded on migration. It

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

, www.refugee-economies.org/assets/downloads/Principles_for_Ethical_Humanitarian_Innovation_-_final_paper.pdf (accessed 25 November 2019) . White , B. T. ( 2019 ), ‘ Refuge and History. A Critical Reading of a Polemic’ , Migration and Society: Advances in Research , 2 , 107 – 18 , doi: 10.3167/arms.2019.020111 .

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

characterise the social relationships of asylum seekers in refugee camps and detention centres. Supported by impactful quotes from asylum seekers who survived violence and war, she elaborates on how strong community ties – largely face-to-face – give way to the formation of weak ties in the face of forced migration. To some extent these interactions allow refugees to restore connections and obtain vital information for their life in an unfamiliar environment. Her findings suggest that these weak ties

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

and a tight timeframe, yet they managed to respond creatively to the peculiar situation in Vienna, where huge empty office buildings had been allocated to shelter new asylum seekers during the ‘summer of migration’ in 2015. The architects had focused on adding simple furnishings that created a more homely environment, articulating a careful, human-centred approach that had interpreted shelter not as four walls and a roof but as a calming and secure internal space. The aim

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

migration and trade policies, Europeans have increasingly opted for a closing-inwards of the nation state, calling into question the viability of the European project itself. The Brexit referendum, in June 2016, provided a clear example of this. Politics on the periphery has taken a similarly illiberal turn, with more violent consequences. In the Philippines, President Rodrigo Duterte boasts of carrying out extrajudicial killings and threatens to kill corrupt state officials, and he has launched a bloody war on drugs, for which he has been

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell, and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

diversity and appropriate formats have also been identified as communicative challenges for humanitarian monitoring and evaluation in South Sudan, especially the ‘large number of national languages spoken and low literacy rates’ ( Steets et al. , 2016 : 28). Research on Greece’s migration crisis has illustrated a need for similar considerations. It has shown, too, that links between language and ICT innovations are complex. For instance, findings based on surveys with 202

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs