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Concerns of linguistic, cultural and military incursion from France emerge more frequently in the wake of the Seven Years’ War. In the literary arena, one of the ways in which these concerns are marked is through the highly-contested national stakes of chivalry. This essay argues that these national stakes of chivalry are negotiated in the realm of the Gothic romance in a particularly fluid and dynamic manner. Addressing recent critical assumptions about the conservatism inherent in prose treatments of medieval chivalry, the essay explores the possibility that Gothic romance recuperates a more positive version of chivalry in the wake of the famous Burke/Wollstonecraft revolutionary debate of 1790.

Gothic Studies

This essay argues that Stephen King‘s 2006 novel Cell explores the age of terror with the aid of two concurrent Gothic discourses. The first such discourse belongs to the tradition that Patrick Brantlinger has termed Imperial Gothic. As such, it imagines with the War on Terror that the threat that the (Gothic) Other constitutes is most usefully managed with the help of massive, military violence. The other, and more traditional, Gothic discourse radically imagines such violence as instead a War of Terror. The essay then argues that Cell does not attempt to reconcile these opposed positions to terror. Instead, the novel employs the two Gothic discourses to describe the epistemological rift that terror inevitably creates.

Gothic Studies
The media and international intervention

The first major post-Cold War conflict, the 1991 Gulf war, indicated how much had already changed. Saddam Hussein had enjoyed Western support in Iraq's war against Iran in the 1980s, but was abruptly cast as the 'new Hitler' after his invasion of Kuwait in August 1990. This book is about how the media have interpreted conflict and international intervention in the years after the Cold War. By comparing press coverage of a number of different wars and crises, it seeks to establish which have been the dominant themes in explaining the post-Cold War international order and to discover how far the patterns established prior to the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks have subsequently changed. The key concern is with the legitimacy of Western intervention: the aim is to investigate the extent to which Western military action is represented in news reporting as justifiable and necessary. The book presents a study that looks at UK press coverage of six conflicts and the international response to them: two instances of 'humanitarian military intervention' (Somalia and Kosovo); two cases in which the international community was criticised for not intervening (Bosnia and Rwanda); and two post-9/11 interventions (Afghanistan and Iraq). There were a number of overlapping UN and US interventions in Somalia in the early 1990s. Operation Restore Hope was the first major instance of post-Cold War humanitarian military intervention, following the precedent set by the establishment of 'safe havens' for Iraqi Kurds and other minorities at the end of the 1991 Gulf war.

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There were a number of overlapping UN and US interventions in Somalia in the early 1990s. The United Nations Mission to Somalia (UNOSOM) began in April 1992 and was succeeded by UNOSOM II, which operated from March 1993 until March 1995. A US airlift of food aid, Operation Provide Relief, was launched in August 1992, and Operation Restore Hope, a UN-authorised military

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Representations of war and rurality in British and American film

‘realities’ of ongoing military campaigns. The Battle of the Somme (1916), famously, combined documentary footage with reconstructions of specific events for the purposes of cinematic entertainment. Small though the genre might be, given the long history of violent conflict as a subject for feature films the diversity of the genre is unsurprising. Indeed, war films struggle against their classification as

in Cinematic countrysides
Monstrous becomings in Abel Ferrara’s Body Snatchers

(Terry Kinney) about the toxicity of chemicals stored on the military base at which he is stationed: Can they interfere with chemoneurological processes? Can they foster psychosis, paranoias, narcophobias? . . . Simply, can they alter a person’s view of reality . . . I’m seeing people at the infirmary who are

in Monstrous adaptations
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This chapter focuses on Operation Enduring Freedom: the US-led military action in Afghanistan, undertaken in response to the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks on the US. In justifying its military response, the US cited both the authority of the UN Security Council, which passed a resolution on 12 September 2001 describing the terrorist attacks as a ‘threat to international

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Art, authorship and activism

This book charts and analyses the work of Oliver Stone – arguably one of the foremost political filmmakers in Hollywood during the last thirty years. Drawing on previously unseen production files from Oliver Stone’s personal archives and hours of interviews both with Stone and a range of present and former associates within the industry, the book employs a thematic structure to explore Stone’s life and work in terms of war, politics, money, love and corporations. This allows the authors both to provide a synthesis of earlier and later film work as well as locate that work within Stone’s developing critique of government. The book explores the development of aesthetic changes in Stone’s filmmaking and locates those changes within ongoing academic debates about the relationship between film and history as well as wider debates about Hollywood and the film industry. All of this is explored with detailed reference to the films themselves and related to a set of wider concerns that Stone has sought to grapple with -the American Century, exceptionalism and the American Dream, global empire, government surveillance and corporate accountability. The book concludes with a perspective on Stone’s ‘brand’ as not just an auteur and commercially viable independent filmmaker but as an activist arguing for a very distinct kind of American exceptionalism that seeks a positive role for the US globally whilst eschewing military adventurism.

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Framing post-Cold War conflicts

justifications promoted by Nato leaders – framing the bombing as an epic struggle of good against evil, drawing comparisons with the Holocaust and justifying military action in terms of moral values based on human rights – drew on ideas and themes which had been developed by journalists advocating tougher action in Bosnia. In at least some cases it is clear that media commentators knew that morally simplified

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
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The last of our case studies concerns another conflict which, at the time of writing, is still ongoing: the invasion and occupation of Iraq. Military action was launched by a US-led coalition on 20 March 2003 as a ‘pre-emptive’ strike, justified mainly through allegations (subsequently proven to be false) that Iraq possessed ‘weapons of mass destruction’ (WMD). A secondary

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts