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Monstrous becomings in Abel Ferrara’s Body Snatchers
Jay McRoy

(Terry Kinney) about the toxicity of chemicals stored on the military base at which he is stationed: Can they interfere with chemoneurological processes? Can they foster psychosis, paranoias, narcophobias? . . . Simply, can they alter a person’s view of reality . . . I’m seeing people at the infirmary who are

in Monstrous adaptations
Jonathan Rayner

type’s evolution across more than a decade, from its inception in features at the beginning of the revival to its migration to television and further development in the mini-series in the early to mid-eighties. The examination of the particular manifestations and characteristics of Australian masculinity is undertaken against contemporary and historical backgrounds. Male institutions, professions and obsessions (farming and shearing, the military, and sport) provide the basis for illustrating aspects of national character

in Contemporary Australian cinema
National identity and the spirit of subaltern vengeance in Nakata Hideo’s Ringu and Gore Verbinski’s The Ring
Linnie Blake

(1957) – a Marlon Brando vehicle that criticised the post-war US policy of preventing GIs from marrying Japanese women by deploying the Japanese shinju sub-plot, whereby Red Buttons and his Japanese bride commit lovers’ suicide in the face of their social exclusion. Giving up a promising military career and marriage to a General’s daughter for his own forbidden love, Brando thus embodies all the

in Monstrous adaptations
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The horrors of class in Eric Kripke’s Supernatural
Julia M. Wright

hero. Here, the series “hangs a lantern” on an easy allegorical reading of the hunters in Supernatural as a rural militia group, protecting post-9/11 America from evil with their secret caches of heavy-duty guns and other weaponry, ex-military personnel, and low-tech concealment of their activities. The military-like rearing of the Winchester

in Men with stakes
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Jonathan Rayner

1942. In addition to the military commitment of men from the colony, the country is a vital agricultural resource for the entire British Empire. The ‘bullocks’ it rears are ‘more important than bullets’ in the context of total war, yet the men who tend and drive them incarnate the same characteristics of endurance, reticence and individuality inculcated by ANZAC propaganda. Fighting and driving are equally valid ‘war jobs’ within the sphere of colonial service and obeisance. Either as an asset or an instrument in the conflict

in Contemporary Australian cinema
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Peter Marks

made it something of a museum piece. With ‘Sympathy For the Devil’ ruled out, Gilliam chose to begin the film surprisingly with Rodgers and Hammerstein’s ‘My Favourite Things’ from The Sound of Music , sung dreamily by the relentlessly wholesome Lennon Sisters, the songbirds of conservative American culture. Television news footage plays over this saccharine rendition, shots of military helicopters

in Terry Gilliam
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Jonathan Rayner

unless, as the representation of Australian subjugation under colonial authority in films depicting educational, military and religious control suggests, defeatism and the surrendering of self-determination is itself a communal characteristic. This pessimistic estimation of human potential flows over from films set in the past to narratives portraying the endeavours of male individuals and groups (the ‘male ensemble’ films), many of which also adopt the characteristics of the AFC genre. Poised between the qualified heroics of

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Australian films in the 1990s
Jonathan Rayner

unreciprocated love, and she believes that discovering his whereabouts will give her life a purpose. At work she meets a range of characters similarly adrift, waiting for the threatened cuts in the postal service which will mean the closure of the Office. The only source of motivation within the Office’s futile activity is its manager Frank (George Delhoyo), a Chilean immigrant whose family was destroyed during the military dictatorship. His emigration to Australia was unplanned, and his avoidance of other refugees leaves him

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Peter Marks

original motivations for the real Grimm brothers was a form of cultural nationalism, so that the tales were meant to represent and transmit something quintessentially German. To collect the tales, then, was an act of cultural preservation. In the context of French domination, the film suggests that such nationalism is a form of resistance, a challenge to French military and cultural power. The French pride

in Terry Gilliam