Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

  • missionary identity x
  • Manchester Shakespeare x
Clear All
Abstract only

the categories of both sex and gender. No longer ‘a woman’, she is also no longer subject to ‘affections’ stereotyped and construed as feminine. In this brief, satirical assertion, Boccaccio encapsulates the twin concerns of this volume: the shifts in social, professional, and personal identity that accompanied changes in religious affiliation, and the ways in which those changes were not simply

in Conversions
And other questions about gender, race, and the visibility of Protestant saints

(whether measured by economic status, gender, or race) but for seemingly being in the wrong place: a singular member of a mid-century London gathered church rather than an indistinguishable product of a large-scale missionary conversion. Because Dinah crosses so many categories, she can help us probe the interrelations of gender, race, and religion. We may also trace the ways cross

in Conversions
Abstract only
The discernment of angels

celebration of the triumph of steadfast faith, and were accompanied by pictures that emphasised the ‘identity, esprit de corps, and missionary work’ of the Society, highlighting devotion, as much as death, in ministry. 75 The Novitiate programme, part of the Palaeochristian revival, favoured the established saints of the early church. Only in the private spaces of the Society, such as the recreation rooms of

in Robert Southwell
Abstract only
Ben Jonson’s admiration for Southwell’s ‘burning Babe’

. English was the language of contestation with English Protestants, vying for the hearts and minds of ordinary English men and women; Latin was the language of the angels, 19 while the vernacular was a weapon of war, whether propaganda or direct assault; Allen by now believed that Catholicism in England would not survive without missionaries trained in active disputation. 20

in Robert Southwell
Gender and conversion in the early modern Mediterranean

medieval eras, the Pauline paradigm of conversion as a ‘totalizing enterprise’, a ‘process of changing a sense of root reality’, a ‘radical reorganization’ of ‘identity, imagination, and consciousness’, has been enshrined in the Christian world. 14 True conversion, when it occurred, was interior and initiated a ‘mutation of the heart’. 15 Indeed, this

in Conversions

qualification. The problematic nature of the inquisitorial documents upon which I have chosen to rely leave no other alternative. All the same, these sources allow us to isolate some of the subtle ways in which an early modern subject and her male interlocutors may have deployed normative ideas about femininity and masculinity in order to offer meaning to her identity and resolve her case. My discussion will

in Conversions

is focused on place, the location of translation in Ireland in this period is sometimes hard to fix, in part since translation is itself a passer of boundaries, in part because of the complications that arise from the troubles of the time and the strength of international alliances. Even more than other writers, translators may be exiles, travellers, missionaries, diplomats, colonists. When we can connect a translated work with Dublin we are struck by other connections as well, outside the city and usually outside the country. Richard Stanihurst declares himself as

in Dublin
Into England

August 1586. 49 He was in a London prison by 14 August, where he was woken by the bells at midnight pealing for the capture of Babington. After four days in the Tower, Babington confessed everything, and the Catholic queen was doomed. 50 The redoubtable Weston continued his missionary activities from various prisons for many years, despite failing health, refusing offers of being bailed to Europe. 51 Southwell

in Robert Southwell
Gender and generation in Robert Southwell’s Epistle to his father

, defining the material and bodily experience that is central to his poetics and by which he seeks to effect conversion, a process I understand here as a mode of affiliation, in which identity is constructed through sensory practices, including speech. 4 Southwell wrote a series of substantial prose works, printed by Henry Garnett’s secret presses. These included the

in Conversions
Abstract only
The thought of the outside in Shakespeare’s histories

. (5.2.2–16) Henry’s war-cry proves how he has learned the lesson of Venus and Adonis and heeded the warning issued to Stanley – ‘where is your boar-spear, man? / Fear you the boar and go so unprovided?’ (3.2.69–70). In fact, the similarity of its language to that of the poem is a key to its Elizabethan occasion. Like the Jesuit missionaries, these

in Shakespeare’s histories and counter-histories