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New retro movies in 1990s Hollywood cinema

, reconstructing the past as an episodic narrative. This narrative dramatises the relationship between past and present, constructing a memory of the past through the recycling of particular iconography that metonymically comes to represent it. Particular fashions, music and visual images are memorialised, and become subject to reinterpretation in the present. Memories of the 1970s in the 1980s, for example, are

in Memory and popular film
A figurative dance suite

100 8 A dance to the music of Herrmann: a figurative dance suite David Cooper M Prelude y earliest encounter with the music of Bernard Herrmann was in the early 1970s, as a teenager growing up in Belfast who was interested in contemporary music and always on the lookout for the scores of new pieces I could afford to buy. I  discovered by sheer chance the music for Bernard Herrmann’s Echoes for string quartet in Tughan-​Crane’s music shop, a somewhat surprising piece for them to have in stock. It was some time later that I found a coupling of the work on LP

in Partners in suspense

24 2 Hitchcock, music and the mathematics of editing Charles Barr ‘Construction to me, it’s like music.’ (Hitchcock, 1995: 298) ‘Every piece of film that you put in the picture should have a purpose. It’s like notes of music. They must make their point.’ (Hitchcock, 1995: 290) I am no kind of music expert, and am not equipped to write about music as such, in the manner of other contributors to this volume such as Jack Sullivan, author of a definitive chapter on ‘Hitchcock and Music’ in the recent collection A Companion to Alfred Hitchcock (2011). Instead

in Partners in suspense

50 4 The therapeutic power of music in Hitchcock’s films Sidney Gottlieb V ertigo (1958) contains not only some of the most memorable music in a Hitchcock film but one of his most grim pronouncements about the limited power of music. After the apparent death of Madeleine before his eyes, Scottie is institutionalised, comatose, beyond hope and help. Midge’s rueful comment perfectly sums up his desperate condition –​which is indeed aesthetic as well as psychological and metaphysical –​as, to coin a phrase, Amadeus absconditus. Mozart isn’t going to be nearly

in Partners in suspense

Even though studies of medieval films include articles, books and entire conferences, critics tend to be silent on the subject of music in films about the medieval period, even though music is a conventional part of narrative cinema. Films use their soundtracks to engage audiences’ emotional responses, to sell CDs and to provide a musical counterpoint to the images on screen. This chapter highlights

in Medieval film
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Film Music, Time and Bernard Herrmann

The tendency in most writing on the temporal properties of film music has been to note music‘s ability to establish, quickly and efficiently, a films historical setting. Although acknowledging this important function, this paper seeks to explore a wider range of temporal properties fulfilled by film music. Three aspects of musics temporality are discussed: anachronism (whereby choices of anachronistic music can provide the spectator with ways of making sense of a films subtext or its characters’ state of mind), navigation (the ability of music to help the spectator understand where and when they are in a films narrative) and expansion (musics ability to expand our experience of film time). The paper focuses on Bernard Herrmann, and his score for Taxi Driver (1976), and argues that Herrmann was particularly sensitive to the temporal possibilities of film music.

Film Studies
Terence Davies and the Paradoxes of Time

This article examines the paradoxes inherent in filmic time, with particular reference to the autobiographical work of the British director Terence Davies. Analysing ways in which film, itself constructed from still images, can create, reverse or freeze temporal flux, confuse and blend multiple and conflicting temporalities, and create the spatial dimensions of an ‘imaginary’ time, it argues that the relationship between film and music may well provide a fundamental key to the understanding of filmic time.

Film Studies
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Essays on Film Music

Among the musical Hitler Émigrés from Vienna to London, pride of place has often been accorded to Hans Keller, a psychologically-minded critic (or, as he described himself, ‘anti-critic’) who dominated the British musical scene for the 40 years that followed 1945. In the period 1946-1959 he devoted himself assiduously to film music, on the one hand laying out the topics that a ‘competent film music critic’ would need to address, and on the other paying scrupulous attention to everything he saw and heard. He shared with Theodor Adorno a loathing of Hollywood, and championed British composers above most others. This selection comes in advance of the publication of his collected writings on film, Film Music and Beyond (London, Plumbago, 2005), and shows on the one hand his topical writings, dealing with the importance of actually listening to film-music, ‘noise as leitmotif’, the contribution of psychology to understanding the function of film music, and classical quotations in film, and on the other hand his writing on composers, including Arthur Benjamin, Georges Auric, William Alwyn, Leonard,Bernstein (On the Waterfront) and Anton Karas (The Third Man).

Film Studies

This article investigates the emotive potency of horror soundtracks. The account illuminates the potency of aural elements in horror cinema to engage spectators body in the light of a philosophical framework of emotion, namely, the embodied appraisal theories of emotion. The significance of aural elements in horror cinema has been gaining recognition in film studies. Yet it still receives relatively scarce attention in the philosophical accounts of film music and cinematic horror, which tend to underappreciate the power of horror film sound and music in inducing emotions. My investigation aims both to address the lacuna, and facilitate dialogue between the two disciplines.

Film Studies
Miscellaneous Remarks on Godards Conceptual Processes Apropos of Sauve qui peut (la vie)

Jean-Luc Godard‘s Sauve qui peut (la vie) holds a uniquely pivotal position in the directors oeuvre and provides the occasion for a case study in how he conceives and develops his works. Amongst the salient features of this process are Godard‘s invention of the ‘video-scenario’ format, enabling him to couch his ideas in visual rather than verbal form from the very moment of their inception; his desire to “look at things a bit scientifically”; and a use of commissioned and pre-existing music which lies at the very heart of his creative method.

Film Studies